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I love it when a thread comes together.
January 26, 2006 6:59 AM   Subscribe

I love it when a thread comes together. Just wanted to share my respect for a perfectly crafted question and answer.
posted by londonmark to Bugs at 6:59 AM (25 comments total)

Sorry, I mis-tagged this -- it was supposed to go in MetaFilter-related...
posted by londonmark at 7:04 AM on January 26, 2006


Thank you for posting this. Even though I've already read the thread, and I'm sure anyone who is actually interested has also read it, I think it's a good idea to make sure we see it here as well. After all, it's not every day that we get a chance to answer simple questions that are obviously Google-lishious.

It's also a good idea to highlight this sort of simple question. After all, why let Wikipedia get all the love? Just because Google or Wikipedia are the obvious place to look for this info, shouldn't we try to answer the question here as well?

And while many will say that the questioner might have made even a minimal attempt to find the answer themselves before posting in to AskMe so some random member could look it up for him, I think it's best if we encourage such simple questions. After all, expecting people to use some initiative and think for themselves is aiding the terrorists or something thing, right?

So *yippee!!!!!* for posting questions with obvious, easy to find answers!!!
posted by y6y6y6 at 7:52 AM on January 26, 2006


y6y6y6, darling, I know we've been fighting a lot lately -- the mortgage, your job, our sex life -- but I don't think it's right to take it out on the kids.
posted by cortex at 8:01 AM on January 26, 2006


Just for fun I decided to paste the thread's title ("the moon's spin and orbit") into Google. I was sort of thinking it would come up with zero good answers and I'd have a perfect contrarian opportunity where I could take myself to task for being snarky and elitist. But no, the first Google result for the thread title has an even better answer than the Wiki article (pictures!!).

I know it's bad form to beat people up for not Googling before they post, but come on...... the thread title?

And calling this out for having a great resolution is just extra special precious. I look forward to future hosannas for answers to questions about the sum of and two. Surely some helpful MeFi member can help settle doubts about that quandary.
posted by y6y6y6 at 8:13 AM on January 26, 2006


Wow, y6y6y6. That's some subtle shit. My sarcasm detector hardly moved at all.

Shit, that wasn't supposed to sound so sarcastic.
posted by Plutor at 8:14 AM on January 26, 2006


You can put your handbag down now honey, I'm beat.
posted by londonmark at 8:20 AM on January 26, 2006


y6y6y6: There is what appears to be a fair amount of misinformation out there about this topic, with many sources citing the friction of the actual oceanic tides on Earth for the slowing of the Earth's rotation. This is not, AFAIK, the same effect as tidal locking which applies to any two bodies one of which orbits the other - regardless of whether one has water.

I'll point you to this easy Google which returns a creation science link as the top result. The second result cites ocean tides as well. The third offers no opinion, the fourth suggests tidal forces on the atmosphere are responsible, etc. etc.

My point is that there is some conflicting info out there on at least my followup, and perhaps the original question had merit in light of that.
posted by Ryvar at 8:26 AM on January 26, 2006


questions about the sum of and two.

I believe the answer is two.
posted by Faint of Butt at 8:33 AM on January 26, 2006


It's a koan.
posted by eddydamascene at 8:39 AM on January 26, 2006


"There is what appears to be a fair amount of misinformation out there about this topic"

Of course. Also much misinformation about how mountains are formed, the efficacy of wearing tinfoil on your head, and how long it takes the earth to rotate. Thus, asking basic science questions in AskMe is better than doing rudimentary research yourself.

You want the truth??? You can not seek the truth!!!! Ask us. We're not like the others. We're your friends.
posted by y6y6y6 at 8:44 AM on January 26, 2006


I'm with Ryvar on this. The answer only seems obvious if you know the answer. There is lots of conflicting information on this.

Sure, the answer pointed to a Wikipedia link but, knowing to look up an entry called "Tidal Locking" again presumes you already know the answer.

Still, you might ask, who is ldenneau (the answerer) and why should we trust his answer is the right answer. And to that, I'd say that there are plenty of people here (myself included) who also knew the answer. Since the given response is correct, there is no reason for me or any of the others to jump in. But had he given the wrong answer, well, then we would have. So there is all that sort of correction going on in the background too.
posted by vacapinta at 8:50 AM on January 26, 2006



posted by puke & cry at 9:09 AM on January 26, 2006


Dear Askme: I need to coerce, by whatever means necessary, a large be-mohawked black man onto an airplane. He is resolutely against flying. What can I do?
posted by cortex at 9:46 AM on January 26, 2006


cortex: have you considered pitying the fool?
posted by Ryvar at 9:54 AM on January 26, 2006


Ryvar: I have, in fact, but sadly the individual in question has beaten me to the punch on that front.

I should have mentioned earlier: I have with me a glass of milk and some sedatives. Can I do anything with those?

posted by cortex at 9:59 AM on January 26, 2006


>GIVE SEDATIVES TO T

Mr. T snarls, "No way, fool! You're tryin' to get me on that plane!"

>PUT SEDATIVES IN MILK

You drop the pills in the glass of milk. They dissolve instantaneously.

>GIVE MILK TO T

Mr. T gladly accepts the glass of milk and drinks it. Within moments, he is passed out on the floor, sleeping like a baby.

>_
posted by Faint of Butt at 10:11 AM on January 26, 2006


Still, you might ask, who is ldenneau (the answerer) and why should we trust his answer is the right answer. And to that, I'd say that there are plenty of people here (myself included) who also knew the answer. Since the given response is correct, there is no reason for me or any of the others to jump in. But had he given the wrong answer, well, then we would have. - vacapinta

Yes, to a point. The asker doesn't know if everyone else's slience is agreement or lack of knowledge on the topic (or having not bothered to read the question). When I ask a question, I can't assume that one answer and silence otherwise means there's a large number of people agreeing, because maybe there's no one else that knows about the mating habits of fleas.
posted by raedyn at 10:15 AM on January 26, 2006


> PUT T ON PLANE

You can't even budge him with the weight of those chains.

> TAKE CHAINS FROM T

That would be a mistake.

>_
posted by Ryvar at 10:16 AM on January 26, 2006


That is an excellent thread. It taught me at least three interesting things. Thanks for drawing my attention to it.
posted by painquale at 10:35 AM on January 26, 2006


There can be collateral benefits to even some of the most seemingly basic questions.

Maybe the answer is relatively easily findable (misleading Google results aside), but I wouldn't have even thought to go looking. In reading the thread, I got some learnin' about something cool that I wouldn't have thought to wonder about. Accidentally learning cool things is one of the draws of this place, for me anyway.
posted by tentacle at 12:43 PM on January 26, 2006


> PROVIDES LINK TO A PHP VERSION OF ZORK

http://thcnet.net/zork/index.php
posted by ND¢ at 12:59 PM on January 26, 2006


"who is ldenneau"

I dunno, but he sounds French.
posted by mr_crash_davis at 1:03 PM on January 26, 2006


Idenneau got best answer?
*adds to Mefoxymoron file, along with this and this*
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 1:51 PM on January 26, 2006


"who is ldenneau"

Isn't he on third?
posted by timeistight at 2:00 PM on January 26, 2006


Hi mefites, I'm not on third, I'm Amerkin not French, the "l" in "ldenneau" is an L, not an I, but it's punny because people think it's an I. Har har. Bigger yuks are available if you know my name is Larry and my SO goes by Mo.

Ryvar: if there's tidal friction, rotation slows down in both bodies until equilibrium is reached. It's the same effect as tidal locking. No further explanation is needed for Earth's slowing rotation.
posted by ldenneau at 3:54 PM on January 26, 2006


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