Where's that damn ringtone variation for piano November 7, 2010 11:42 AM   Subscribe

Sometime this year, someone made a post on one of the very common ring tones used by many cell phones (which I can't replicate here sans an audio file). Some claimed to be the most recognizable and oft-played melody on the planet. One of the links was to a classical-style piano variation that used the ring tone as a point of departure. I can't find it, and it's killing me.

I've tried as many search terms as I can think of: cell phone, ring tone, piano variation, nokia, etc. I'd love your help in finding this post/link!
posted by foxy_hedgehog to MetaFilter-Related at 11:42 AM (25 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite

This?
posted by BeerFilter at 11:45 AM on November 7, 2010 [2 favorites]


Perhaps this video from this FPP?
posted by anifinder at 11:46 AM on November 7, 2010


From the FPP mentioned by the OP, DecemberBoy wrote: You know, I could probably now build a cell phone operated detonator from the information in [that picture]. I can clearly see the markings on the chip, the relay, even the resistor color codes. Just saying.

Out of curiosity, wouldn't it be reasonably trivial to make a remote activation switch by just wiring the trigger to the speaker in the phone? When you get a call, it sends electricity to the speaker (which then goes to the trigger) which activates the weapon?

Or, would there not be enough electricity going to the ringtone speaker?
posted by 47triple2 at 12:06 PM on November 7, 2010


Marc André Hamelin, Valse d'Irritation
[Yeah. Today is piano day.]
posted by Namlit at 12:07 PM on November 7, 2010 [1 favorite]


I always remember cells going off with Fur Elise
posted by P.o.B. at 12:09 PM on November 7, 2010 [1 favorite]


The funny thing about Hamelin's variations is that he doesn't seem to realize that the Nokia tune derives from some obscure chamber music work, also in a waltzy rhythm, but as I recall with different downbeats. Of course, I can´t remember the composer (some Scandinavian dude, no doubt; heard it in my car in Sweden a few years ago).
posted by Namlit at 12:18 PM on November 7, 2010


On pre-pre-view yes, it's down in BeerFilter's thread. Fnny, the piece I remember that the radio announcer claimed was the inspiration for the Nokia waltz was a different one from that guitar tune. Awell...
posted by Namlit at 12:24 PM on November 7, 2010


Beer Filter for the win in three minutes! You guys are awesome.
posted by foxy_hedgehog at 12:33 PM on November 7, 2010


For the record I used Google with the terms `metafilter nokia ringtone`.
posted by BeerFilter at 12:54 PM on November 7, 2010


From BeerFilter's link: There is nothing even remotely scientific about the claim and I feel sure it is wrong.

This is my favorite sentence of the day (no insult to marginaliana intended).
posted by carsonb at 1:10 PM on November 7, 2010


Or, would there not be enough electricity going to the ringtone speaker?

Not that I'm a terrrist or anything, but you'd probably want to use the vibrating motor - much more usable current there.
posted by le morte de bea arthur at 1:41 PM on November 7, 2010


Metafilter: you'd probably want to use the vibrating motor
posted by Splunge at 3:31 PM on November 7, 2010


I can't ever hear it without hearing the "lyrics" as sung by Ed Helms (when he was on the Daily Show and there was some skit on "Cellphone Awareness Month"):

You annoying, stupid douchebag, turn your phone off now!
posted by sonika at 4:32 PM on November 7, 2010 [1 favorite]


When you get a call, it sends electricity to the speaker (which then goes to the trigger) which activates the weapon?

It's not really that simple. The amount of voltage and current coming into the speaker (or the vibrate ringer motor) is pretty minuscule and likely isn't enough to power or trigger anything, so you have to use a relay to switch a real power source. Moreover the signal going to the speaker is AC and bursty so you really need a rectifier and latch.
posted by Rhomboid at 4:34 PM on November 7, 2010


Moreover the signal going to the speaker is AC and bursty so you really need a rectifier and latch.

Wouldn't the vibrate motor be a reasonably constant supply? And, I thinking that on the bomb you would have the power surge start something else. Although, I suppose it would also make sense, if you could, to make the power in the arming device go through the vibrate motor switch on the logic board.

Assuming the vibrate motor works the way I think it does. Which it probably doesn't. :P
posted by 47triple2 at 5:23 PM on November 7, 2010


It's awesome when the Nokia owner in question has a two-syllable name. I always used to sing along with "Gary's phone rings, Gary's phone rings, Gary's phone rings nowwww" when my former boss's Nokia would ring.
posted by ErikaB at 6:02 PM on November 7, 2010 [1 favorite]


Which it probably doesn't. :P

It does-ish.

The vibrator motor in phones and pagers is a purely DC device, and does require a bit of current, so it makes a good relay/SCR/transistor gate driver.
posted by fake at 6:52 PM on November 7, 2010


Wouldn't the vibrate motor be a reasonably constant supply?

Yes, but there's still only a minuscule amount of power there. I just checked a few datasheets on mouser and they were all specified at 1.3V and 90mA. Even at full battery voltage the phone could only deliver one cell's worth of voltage, usually around 3.7V. The simplest electronic fuse I can think of, a model rocket igniter, requires a nominal 12V and 1-2A, but the actual measured peak currents are as high as 15-20 A for a hundred ms or so.
posted by Rhomboid at 7:06 PM on November 7, 2010


I was going to guess Cannon in D. Good job BeerFilter, I missed that thread!

Anyway, my ringtone is "Yakety Sax." It makes me laugh and smile everytime I hear it and hopefully to those around me who have to deal with it too.
posted by liquoredonlife at 8:10 PM on November 7, 2010


Yes, but there's still only a minuscule amount of power there.

You wouldn't need to use the voltage of the cell phone to ignite anything, though, just a really sensitive relay and a bigger power supply.
posted by wayland at 10:26 PM on November 7, 2010


just a really sensitive relay and a bigger power supply.

Um, yes, that's kind of been my point the whole time. The original statement was "why the extra circuitry, couldn't the phone just trigger the ignition directly" and I've been trying to explain why you would need a relay and glue logic.
posted by Rhomboid at 11:06 PM on November 7, 2010


Anyway, my ringtone is "Yakety Sax yt ." It makes me laugh and smile everytime I hear it and hopefully to those around me who have to deal with it too.

Mine is Bananaphone, which always gets a reaction usually of "WTF?!" mixed with laughter.
posted by sonika at 5:57 AM on November 8, 2010


carsonb, I'm glad it amused you. For the record, I still agree with my statement - it's a wishy-washy bullshit claim made up by Nokia with no scientific basis, that's been adopted as a point of trivia and assumed to be true by everyone else. It gets my goat!
posted by marginaliana at 7:06 AM on November 8, 2010


I don't use it all the time, but my favorite ringtone might be the LRAD the Pittsburgh police used during the G20 protests.
posted by box at 10:26 AM on November 8, 2010


piggy back question? Anybody know what's the ringtone Jack Davenport (Gael Garcia Bernal) and Carmen (Penelope Cruz) have in "Sin Noticias de Dios/Don't Tempt Me"?

I thought it would be in one of my old Nokias (looks like what they have) but can't find. I'd love to have the actual Ringtone from Hell.
posted by toodleydoodley at 4:28 PM on November 9, 2010


« Older I am not your...Doctor, Therapist/Counselor...   |   Pony request: can I see proposed IRL events on my... Newer »

You are not logged in, either login or create an account to post comments