Metatalktail Hour: A Dagwood Special September 17, 2022 2:05 AM   Subscribe

Happy weekend, friends! Today's Metatalktail hour topic is simply, "favorite sandwich?" What is it and how do you make it? Bonus points for weird!

And tell us your sandwich rules! What's the best bread? Are you fiddly about crusts? Do you cut on the diagonal, or straight up and down? Or are you a no-cut person? Toasted or plain? Panini press or puffy? Goopy or neat? Minimalist or maximalist? And what's on the side? Pickle? Chips? Fries? Nada?

Are you a dipper?

Or just let us know how you are doing, what you've been up to. But no politics, please!
posted by taz (staff) to MetaFilter-Related at 2:05 AM (121 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite

Favorite: Baguette, but not too crusty. Hollowed out only a little bit. Layer as follows: good tasting olive oil, fresh arugula, slices of fresh mozzarella that have been well drained and patted dry, generously sprinkle with large grind cracked black pepper, at least three layers of prosciutto, then the top of the bread gets spread with fig jam so it sticks to the prosciutto. Others prefer this toasted, I do not. It’s much better at room temp.

Rules and errata: If the sandwich is on square bread I prefer diagonal cut, of course. But if it is on oval slices then straight down the middle. I do not understand the appeal of focaccia as a sandwich bread, clearly it is a dipping bread. All sandwiches should have a vegetal element, but they don’t actually need to be in the sandwich to count, thus, grilled cheese and tomato soup. Cabbage is often better on sandwiches than lettuce, especially the horrible mesclun mix. When utilizing tomatoes you need to account for the sog factor very carefully and prevent it via construction, spread application, or preparation.

Is a lettuce wrap a sandwich? I hesitate to even bring it up.
posted by Mizu at 3:05 AM on September 17 [4 favorites]


I am nodding contentedly that "Is X a sandwich?" has been broached in the very first comment. ❤️
posted by taz (staff) at 3:39 AM on September 17 [20 favorites]


The villanelle sandwich, naturally.

Beyond that, the best sandwich is the sandwich the body most desires at the time, and that's many bodies and many sandwiches.

I still remember the day when I realised I liked fresh tomatoes in some contexts, after a lifetime of only ever being served the awful orange watery out-of-season kind. I was eighteen years old and in Paris, and we'd been to the Louvre that morning, and I hadn't yet worked out that I needed to eat food in order to not get hangry, so I hadn't had any breakfast, and I'd walked around looking at art for hours (and hadn't yet worked out that I'm also a terrible museum patron). And I was getting so cranky that the friend I was with couldn't bear it, so we went outside and found a Paul stand and I got a tomato, mozzarella and pesto baguette because it was literally the only vegetarian option even though I was convinced I'd hate it because of the tomatoes. Except I was so ravenous that it turned out to be the most divine sandwich I'd ever consumed. I ate it on the big wheel in the Tuileries and followed it up with a bag of hot donuts and ever since then fresh tomatoes have been at least a sometimes food.

The best sandwich I could go into a store and buy right now is the M&S NY style pretzel roll with vegan pastrami. The pickles are exceptionally crunchy. The only flaw is that the bun is tall and my jaw is not and I have to open my mouth past the point where the joints start locking and crackling to cram this delicious fucker inside.

Grainy, salty houmous mixed with corn is the single best vegetarian substitute I've found for the tuna mayo sandwiches that were a fixture of my childhood. On a cold day when I'm particularly hungry, a toasted sandwich made with big soft bread and lots of onion jam, gouda and vegetarian sausage hits the spot like nothing else. When I was living in Spain and the place that was supposed to feed me as part of my job contract couldn't handle my incredibly modest dietary requirements, I'd buy a long crusty baguette, tear it open with my bare hands, stuff it with tortilla de patatas and sliced cheese, and dip the whole thing in the kind of gazpacho that comes from a carton.

And in case anyone was wondering where I sit on the sandwich alignment chart, there's a warm place inside my heart for the perfect burrito, stuffed to bursting with add-ons, wet with two kinds of beans, so gooey inside that it requires chips for scooping out the fillings. The kind that will definitely drip at least 50ml of sour cream-salsa-bean water out of the bottom folds, no matter how expertly wrapped or how supple the tortilla, to be licked out of the crumpled foil at the very end of the whole glorious experience. The kind that's best enjoyed half-dressed in a hotel room, utterly, depravedly alone.
posted by terretu at 4:28 AM on September 17 [12 favorites]


I have weirdly stopped being much of a sandwich person, even for lunches; I'm more likely to pack a salad or stew in my lunchbox. But I do have a couple things I'll still say yes to:

BLT. One of the few sandwiches I will make myself.

Jambon au beurre. Simplicity for a box lunch as well - baguette, sliced ham, butter, done.

Po' Boys or Muffalettas. I sadly need to be careful with the last one, to make sure that there isn't any cauliflower in the olive salad (cauliflower gives me pretty bad indigestion); but strangely, that means it's one of the few things that for me are better outside their point of origin, because most people outside New Orleans hear "olive salad" and put only olives in it, and that makes it okay for me.

If a hot dog counts as a sandwich: Chicago style. No question. And this is a New Yorker saying this.

Lots of New Yorkers have a go-to for their breakfast sandwich. My order is usually sausage/egg/cheese, with the eggs soft-scrambled and cheddar for the cheese where possible, on a roll.

And: technically a hamburger or cheeseburger counts as a sandwich. So: the cheeseburgers at Shady Glen diner in Eastern Connecticut are the best cheeseburgers in the world. This is known.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 4:35 AM on September 17 [6 favorites]


For Commanders only
posted by chavenet at 4:36 AM on September 17 [5 favorites]


I almost never eat sandwiches. Most of my bread is consumed as French toast. So this is a tough one for me! I think I’ll go with tofu banh mi - not a thing I eat often at all, but definitely what comes to mind when I think of incredible sandwich experiences.

I’ll finally be seeing my doctor (well, APN) this coming week to see if there’s any more digging to do on my post-covid fatigue and other unwellness (or to see if it’s something else entirely…). I thought I’d turned a corner a few weeks ago, but this week I’m back to, like, having to shower sitting down and stuff. I haven’t seen her in several years so I’m really due anyway.
posted by obfuscation at 4:42 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


I defer to this guy! I am not 100% sure but think he is one of us, I await his pronouncements and decrees here in the thread.
posted by Meatbomb at 4:51 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


Let's get it out of the way: The Cube Rule of Food Identification.
posted by zengargoyle at 5:20 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


I literally woke up this morning from a dream in which I was standing at a counter in a deli in my hometown (which deli hasn't been in existence for at least thirty years) watching them assemble a Maine Italian Sandwich for me (the hometown is in central New Hampshire, but that's the kind of sandwiches that deli made.) So disappointing to wake up. The biggest thing that differentiates a Maine Italian sandwich from the standard Italian sub you get everywhere is that it has green bell peppers on it. I ordinarily can't stand green bell peppers at all, but an Italian sandwich just doesn't taste right without them.

Other than those, my favorite sandwich is a Reuben, but I find I have to make it myself to get it the way I like it. Most delis get the proportions all wrong, stacking the meat several inches high so it's hard to eat and doesn't get hot all the way through and there's too much meat and not enough of the other stuff. (One deli chain around here actually takes the corned beef and sauerkraut, layers them together and rolls them into a cylinder, which cylinder is about three inches in diameter, before placing it on the sandwich, leaving pathetic bare ends of bread sticking out on both sides. This is a grave misunderstanding of a Reuben.) I make it with thinly sliced rye, Russian dressing on both slices of bread, a slice of Swiss, no more than two ounces of thinly sliced corned beef, a small amount of sauerkraut, another slice of Swiss, and then the second slice of bread on top. Grilled on both sides while pressing down with a spatula - the whole sandwich should be about an inch high when it's finished, with all ingredients heated through and thoroughly melded together. And a half-sour pickle on the side.
posted by Daily Alice at 5:52 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


Avocado, alfalfa sprouts, red onion, tomatoes, aged cheddar, mayo, on very lightly toasted whole wheat.
posted by Jeanne at 6:13 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


Here's my favorite camping/road trip sandwich.
posted by Tenuki at 6:27 AM on September 17 [3 favorites]


Similarly I don't eat sandwiches much, certainly not that I make. My current favorite to go buy is the Steak Tartare Club from Mean Sandwich.

Flying back to CA again (7th time this year) to deal with my parents' illness. Not looking forward to the airport, but everything else should be pretty easy.

Figured out how to produce a report at work to allow management to slice and dice diversity data to highlight intersectionality in a way they have not been able to thus far. At least, not without a lot of manual work. My management chain will be very happy with, once I package it a little more neatly. So that's good.

And I continue to cycle to work, which makes me calm. Well, calmer.
posted by Gorgik at 6:59 AM on September 17 [1 favorite]


if I am buying a sandwich, then the porchetta sandwich from Salumi's in Seattle.
if I am making my own, then a jamon, queso y huevo in cuban bread squished down in my plancha.
however, right now i'm in Singapore so i'm deep, deep, deeeeeep into satay - yes with the extra peanut sauce....
posted by alchemist at 7:30 AM on September 17 [1 favorite]


Ciabatta roll lightly toasted, buttered, with sunnyside up egg, fresh summer tomato, arugula, a sharp cheese, and a generous dash of Aardvark hot sauce. Serve with medium-to-dark coffee, black.

I am continuing to not sign up for new things, which is nice. Read a book, dipping into a new-to-me game, read a different book for book club this week, and there's reliably a chill in the morning air which means I get to start thinking about busting out the cozy clothes soon.
posted by curious nu at 7:56 AM on September 17 [3 favorites]


My favorite sandwich is what in our house we call a "secret sandwich" - which is when you arrive back from walking or working or just being out and you split open a hunk of baguette or what-have-you and slice a piece of cheddar and slather on some dijon or zhoug or calabrian pepper paste and then you eat it quietly in the kitchen, letting the crumbs fall on the cutting board, because you just had a long conversation about what you were going to cook for dinner but here you are making a sandwich.
posted by niicholas at 7:57 AM on September 17 [6 favorites]


When I was growing up my family would make Statler sandwiches for dinner on a regular basis. I had no idea it was such an obscure sandwich.

It's kind of bland and takes a lot of prep for a sandwich. I am not surprised to find that it was born in 1953.

Family recipe for anyone who lives a particularly time-consuming sandwich:

Prep:
Hard boil an egg and slice it.
Make Russian dressing.
Slice a tomato.
Toast 2 slices NY rye bread.

Assemble open faced bottom to top:
Toast
Turkey
Tomato
Egg
Dressing

Attempt to eat it without it falling apart.
posted by RobinofFrocksley at 8:07 AM on September 17 [3 favorites]


My dad used to make peanut butter and mayonnaise sandwiches on toasted white bread. I told him that was gross, and he challenged me to try it before I judged it. So I did.

It wasn't as gross as it sounds. I've even made one or two in my lifetime, but it's been a few decades. I'm not sure it's worth revisiting.
posted by under_petticoat_rule at 8:40 AM on September 17


Whole wheat bread, homemade hummus, iceberg lettuce, eaten in our vehicle after snowboarding all morning.
posted by hilaryjade at 8:48 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


Panera used to do a bacon, egg, and cheese on a bagel pressed in a panini press. Alas, I think they stopped that one. Now I am getting the lumberjack from Brueggers which is ham not bacon, but still good. Non-breakfast then I will go with an Italian sub, no tomato. If I am making my own, it will either be turkey and provolone or grilled cheese. Instead of pan frying, you can make grilled cheese in an airfryer or toaster oven, 5 minutes per side and I do that when making more than 2 at a time.
posted by soelo at 8:48 AM on September 17 [1 favorite]


A few years ago I went mostly plant-based for health reasons. While I did ok making various meals, the one thing I missed a lot was a really good sandwich, with not being able to have deli meat or real cheese or tuna/chicken salad.

Eventually I came up with the below, and it was so good I took to eating it several times a week:

2 slices of whole-grain bread
Spread with hummus (however much looks right to you)
Add a generous sprinkle of Salad Toppins
Add lettuce, tomato, pickles
Eat. Swoon.

Another favorite during this time was chickpea salad made like a chicken salad:

Mash up some chickpeas (you're not making hummus, you want them smashed up but with chunks)
Use hummus in place of mayo (might want to thin it with a little bit of water)
Add chopped celery, halved grapes and chopped nuts (walnuts or pecans or cashews)
Eat with a fork or spread on whole grain bread and add whatever sandwich fixings you like.
posted by Serene Empress Dork at 8:52 AM on September 17 [4 favorites]


Oh, hah - I've just remembered an erstwhile sub shop back in my home town, which my BFFs and I would frequent from about age 13 to age 17. It was a small sandwich shop, maybe only about 3 café tables in the whole place, and it did that thing where it named each of its sandwiches after cities, inspired by the ingredients therein.

Even back then I was obsessed with New York City and how I knew I was going to move here when I grew up, so the very first time I walked in, I ordered a "New York", and never EVER deviated from that order. I think it was pastrami and corned beef with provolone.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:57 AM on September 17 [3 favorites]


When I was a kid, I used to make cheese sandwiches on white or wheat sandwich bread, with sliced American cheese and mayo. I remember I really liked them at the time. I was tempted to make one the other day just to see if I still think it's good but decided I wasn't really in the mood to be disappointed.
posted by Serene Empress Dork at 8:59 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


Ooh, I will need to try hummus on my next turkey sandwich.
posted by soelo at 9:03 AM on September 17


I love me a good sandwich!

A couple not previously mentioned are the Albuquerque turkey (with green chile, pepper jack cheese, and optional avocado) and Rachel (riffing on a Reuben, but subbing in pastrami for the corned beef, and cole slaw for sauerkraut).
posted by NotLost at 9:10 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


I'm a person of simple tastes, and also Dutch.
Some sandwiches I like are:
- lettuce & cheese
- peanut butter, sambal (Indonesian chilli sauce) and cucumber
- peanut butter & banana slices
On wholewheat bread, of course.

If a pita with falafel counts as a sandwich:
- pita, falafel, fried eggplant, lettuce, tomato, onion, olives, pickled peppers, hot sauce, cilantro, tahina, garlic sauce.
So much for simple tastes! (Still Dutch though.)
posted by Too-Ticky at 9:40 AM on September 17 [6 favorites]


The best sandwich I could go into a store and buy right now is the M&S NY style pretzel roll with vegan pastrami.

For a while a few years ago, Waitrose had in their Heston Blumenthal range, hm, let me see if I can find a description anywhere... there we go: a "charcoal bagel topped with chia seeds and filled with lapsang souchong tea smoked salmon, dill and caraway pickled cucumber, and soft cheese". The charcoal bagels were nothing special - I mean, yes, very black, but I could get a Brick Lane bagel as I passed through St Pancras station in the morning, and those raised the bar rather. But the filling was fantastic. You can still get the tea-smoked salmon (albeit at £7.50 for 100g), and it's very nice, but I really wish they'd published the recipe for the pickled cucumber.

The best homemade sandwich I've had in the last six months or so was just this week: basil and garlic king prawns with semi-dried tomatoes with mixed leaves on sourdough toast. The only thing that could have made it better would have been some sorrel and pea shoots amongst the mixed leaves.

But. As a general rule, a good bacon sandwich - smoked back bacon, fried not grilled, on thick slices of good crusty white bread, either buttered or dipped in the fat that's cooked out of the bacon - is very hard to beat. Optionally, add a fried egg (with a sprinkle of salt). A proper sausage sandwich is also right up there: British pork sausages (regional speciality of your choice, although I have a friend who will be very disappointed in me if I don't specify Lincolnshire), again pan-fried, butter, white bread, good sharp mustard. Personally I do not care for any of the sweet sauces people often add to either sandwich (ketchup, HP, etc.) and neither am I a fan of the fried onions many people would add to the sausage sandwich; I know, I'm a heathen.

Finally: Soft white roll OR sourdough toast; tartare sauce; fishfingers; crisp shredded iceberg lettuce. Vinegar-sharp, crunchy, savoury, hot with contrasting cool. Perfect.
posted by ManyLeggedCreature at 10:58 AM on September 17 [1 favorite]


I would have to say that my new favorite sandwich is herb goatcheese with roasted red peppers a drizzle of balsamic on a toasted ciabatta roll, perhaps with a little sprig of my favorite greens.

- chop up a half cup of your favorite herb
- mix with 10 oz of goatcheese (room temp for mixing)
- roast peppers (I broil in toaster oven for about 12 minutes, then peel.
- toast roll and assemble.

I usually make up the herb goat cheese and roasted peppers and then assemble sandwiches all week.

I also have fond memories of my grandmother making me peanut butter and bacon sandwiches.
posted by brookeb at 11:20 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


Several variations involving turkey, cream cheese, and strawberry or raspberry or blackberry jam, based on but not exactly an Elena Ruz sandwich [archive link]. Fresh leaves of spinach, sprouts, bacon, many kinds of bread, etc. work for me.
posted by Wobbuffet at 11:38 AM on September 17 [1 favorite]


My favorite lunch sandwich is smoked sardines, red onion, greens, red wine vinegar, and a sprinkle of kosher salt on ciabatta or similar bread. It's even better served open-faced on bread slices that have been toasted, then rubbed with the cut side of a cut clove of garlic. For breakfast, this Jersey lad has to go with pork roll, egg (fried), and cheese with ketchup, pepper, and Cholula hot sauce on a kaiser roll.
posted by mollweide at 11:58 AM on September 17 [2 favorites]


- peanut butter, sambal (Indonesian chilli sauce) and cucumber

holy shit - ! that sounds interesting as hell ... maybe delicious. Every now and then you come across combinations that you wouldn't think of yourself but they turn out to be terrific.

An old girlfriend turned me on to a similar one, Toasted Rye (ideally) and then cream cheese and black olives. Maybe a little seasoning salt. I haven't made one since she showed me, but I think about it a couple times a year. It was so remarkably wasp-y: it made me yearn for a life I did not lead.

Lately I've made a bunch of tuna salad - my secret is estragon/tarragon. (Along with the usual diced celery, red pepper, red onion, salt and pepper and mayo).

It's pear harvesting time, and apple and plum - and we have some trees. Four of each, though a couple of the plum seem to be half-wild (stay up late, talk lots of trash, a touch shabby and maybe louch). We had a sort of picking-party last weekend, picked fifteen crates of fruit, which I then brought to a presser/juice/'Mosterei' in German. We had no real idea of what we were doing - how much it was going to result in or - anything, really. Turns out to be about 280 litres - call it 70 gallons, of apple and pear juice, divvied up in 24 cases of 12 bottles each. And it's yummy. And took two trips to get from the press back home because we aren't in the US anymore and I don't have a pickup anymore.

The apple trees are still about half-full as well as the plum trees. The guy who runs the press said it has been an absolutely crazy year for fruit. I don't know what it means, if it means anything, but of course I keep poking around in the background to see if I feel any intimations of anything. So far nothing, and I take that as a good thing.

I've been googling making calvados/apple brandy since we have such a surplus - there is the fact that I have no taste for alcohol anymore, but I like the idea - like cooking something you've never made.

In the middle of all the apple picking a small flock of storks flew over, headed for Africa. What an extraordinary thing, that.
posted by From Bklyn at 12:06 PM on September 17 [9 favorites]


Made San'ch
Pressed Italian Picnic Loaf
Fried eggs between toast -- with garden eggs from hens I feed and garlic sriracha or Valetina hot sauce

Bought San'ch:
Canteen fry-up (egg/soss/hash brown/brown sauce) between buttered toast
Pret Salmon/Cream Cheese
M&S homage to the Reuben
posted by k3ninho at 12:17 PM on September 17 [1 favorite]


Also good are mint, cucumber and tomato sandwiches. The mint gives it extra zest.
posted by NotLost at 12:19 PM on September 17 [2 favorites]


omg, you people have game when it comes to sandwiches. I'm in awe. And so going to be trying some of these. Wow.
posted by taz (staff) at 12:44 PM on September 17 [4 favorites]


Hey k3ninho, when you say garlic sriracha, do you mean this stuff?
posted by ManyLeggedCreature at 1:01 PM on September 17


A Dominó hotdog (actually, completo) in downtown Santiago.
posted by signal at 1:19 PM on September 17 [3 favorites]


Oh man, how did I forget about breakfast sandwiches? Clearly where the best sandwiches lie. A fresh biscuit, fried egg with a just-set yolk, just about any kind of cheese, some grainy mustard and avocado… mmmm. Yes please.
posted by obfuscation at 1:52 PM on September 17 [5 favorites]


At my university there was a deli in the student union building. They sold sandwiches, bagels, and bagel sandwiches. You could get a bagel veggie sandwich at a sandwich price, but you could add veggies to any sandwich for something ridiculous like 65 cents. So naturally one would order a bagel, and add veggies. Price came out to like $1.65 compared to something like $5.25 for the exact same thing if you ordered it as a veggie sandwich on a bagel. I don't remember the actual prices, this was 40 years ago, but the difference was substantial.

Eventually management wised up around my 5th year and changed the rules, you could then only get veggies added to an ACTUAL SANDWICH. Got a lot of cheap veggie sandwiches before they did though.
posted by under_petticoat_rule at 2:02 PM on September 17 [1 favorite]


Bucking the system is one of the best condiments on a sandwich.
posted by obfuscation at 2:14 PM on September 17 [5 favorites]


The best sandwich I’ve ever had was like 20 years ago in some cafe at Heathrow: white cheddar cheese, arugula with mango chutney slathered on some kind of soft French roll. I had never had chutney before. That mix of salty , sweet and spicy is amazing.
posted by gt2 at 2:57 PM on September 17 [3 favorites]


ManyLeggedCreature: k3ninho, when you say garlic sriracha
Yes, exactly that: brown lid for extra garlic. It's like getting addicted to dancing out your feelings, the way we put garlic in food in my house.
posted by k3ninho at 3:39 PM on September 17 [4 favorites]


Oh man, how did I forget about breakfast sandwiches? Clearly where the best sandwiches lie.

Panera used to make what they called a "breakfast power sandwich" that I loved. Some kind of grainy bread, a good ham, an egg and white cheddar cheese, cooked on a panini press I believe. I'd have them add lettuce, tomato and mayo after it came off the press. It was so good.
posted by Serene Empress Dork at 3:42 PM on September 17 [2 favorites]


I'm firmly in the camp of "Anything wrapped or on starch, kinda, is a sandwich; meaning you can theoretically eat with one hand while driving, or eat with both hands, does not require utensils, but maybe does when it fall apart, so Yah Get Your Sandwich On." I do not care to argue, I care to eat the many delicious results.
Grill cheese on dark seeded rye with apple slices and Oregon cheddar.
Toasted sourdough muffins with chunky melted peanut butter and fancy jam, squished together hard. I'm thinking about that sambal and cucumbers mentioned above.
When I had access to a 220V Italian sandwich press, I loved this: thick gyro bread (doesn't have a pocket) spread with hummus and provolone, grilled little bit of chicken, bacon, cucumber, greens, tomatoes, dollop of mayo in the middle where the heat won't get to. Fold over and grill until golden/grill marks on outside.
I had a not great fennel and artichoke sandwich today, it was weirdly sweet without any texture from bread or ingredients. I think they used pickled artichokes. Still, I went out with two of the people I like to eat with the most, had some excellent olives, and got some stuff for brunch tomorrow. I'm not mad about a mediocre sandwich, it usually makes me think "how would I make that better?".... which is a great antidote to my not wanting to make food because I have to eat, so eating chips instead.
posted by winesong at 5:23 PM on September 17


Winco in my town has a peanut butter grinder, so I choose the plain roasted peanuts to grind. All summer I have peanut butter and Armenian cucumber open faced sandwiches for breakfast with fruit on the side. I sprinkle on some Spike seasoning, or a splash of Tabasco, except then I also make peanut butter and strawberry open face sandwiches, or peanut butter and peach sandwiches with a little cinnamon, or peanut butter and sundried tomatoes. I sometimes use homemade bread and butter pickles with the peanut butter, or vinegared cucumber and tomato salad on top. Sometimes, I for sure make open faced melted Goat Gouda, or Dubliner Cheese, or Münster Cheese, over garden tomato, sandwiches. Only one open faced sandwich per day, usually at breakfast.

Anybody else have a military dad who discussed having a little burbon sandwich?
posted by Oyéah at 5:43 PM on September 17 [4 favorites]


Tone a Jim Beam sauce with onion shoots, choice of cheese on a burger. hmm

Spucadella bread for a good spuckie. I'd add lite olive oil, tad of Basil...Cotto salami, polish ham, venetian pepperoni.
posted by clavdivs at 6:53 PM on September 17


Leftover chicken sprinkled with sesame oil on crunchy French or white bread, toasted with a little mayo and tomato slices.
posted by Rash at 7:58 PM on September 17 [1 favorite]


the reality is that the best sandwich is a bahn motherfucking mi and i will fight you
posted by lalochezia at 8:21 PM on September 17 [6 favorites]


You all are way more creative with sandwiches than I am.
My absolute favorite is still a classic Italian hoagie - Genoa salami, Capacola, ham, and provolone cheese, on a crusty Italian long roll with lettuce, tomato, onions, oregano, salt, pepper and olive oil and vinegar.
I was something of a picky eater as a kid. For a significant period of time, per my mother, the only thing I would eat for lunch was a BLT (toasted bread, light on the mayo). I still like a good BLT, though I've upgraded the bread to a crusty whole wheat, and when making it myself I sometimes add some sliced avocado.
Another childhood favorite is egg salad on toasted bread with lettuce. Following my mother, my egg salad is just chopped egg, chopped celery, mayo, Dijon mustard, celery salt, and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice (the celery salt and lemon juice make it).
Corned beef on rye bread with Russian dressing and coleslaw is another childhood favorite. You spread the Russian dressing on the rye bread slices like you would butter or mayo and then heap on some good corned beef, and then coleslaw.
A more recent like - crusty Italian or French baguette style bread, sliced fresh mozzarella and sliced tomatoes, fresh basil leaves and some balsamic salad dressing drizzled on. You can also spread some basil pesto on the bread if you like.
We lived in France for 3 years when I was a kid, and I always got a Croque Monsieur when we went out for lunch.
posted by gudrun at 8:30 PM on September 17 [2 favorites]


Imgur; "My dad made me a pbj 2.0 when you close it you get 9 different flavor combos. rows: strawberry preserves, honey, and marshmallow fluff. Columns: crunchy peanut butter, nutella, creamy peanut butter."
posted by MollyRealized at 9:26 PM on September 17 [5 favorites]


lalochezia makes a strong argument. There was a food truck near where I used to work that had an incredible tofu bahn mi that's pretty high on my list of best sandwiches. A good lox bagel is also pretty high on my list: sesame seed bagel, nova lox, cream cheese, capers, maybe some greens; a little black pepper if you're feeling feisty. For a sandwich I'll just make for myself when I'm hungry and lazy, pretty much nothing beats a peanut butter and banana sandwich.

Anyway I don't think the set of sandwiches is well-ordered. I'm happy to accept multiple sandwiches as my favorite.
posted by biogeo at 9:45 PM on September 17


New York pizza. Pizza's not a sandwich?

Ha!

You grab that slice, and fold it over. Sandwich! Count the layers-bread, sauce, cheese, sauce, bread.

That's a sandwich.
posted by Marky at 9:45 PM on September 17 [1 favorite]


Stjerneskud. Open-faced sandwiches are sandwiches.
posted by Dysk at 9:51 PM on September 17 [1 favorite]


Lalochezia has it: Chicken Bahn Mi is the correct answer.

Runner up is toasted Ciabatta, fresh mozz, chicken, tomato, arugula, and most importantly basil pesto.

Best sandwich you can get anywhere (Panera) is toasted focaccia, pulled chicken, mozz, tomatoes, and basil. Just start with the Toasted Frontega Chicken and hold the onions & Chipotle sauce. Maybe double the chicken if you’re starving; the default is pretty light.

The recurring themes here are: 1) mayo/aoli are fucking Satan and 2) filling, delicious, but relatively healthy is the best way to eat.
posted by Ryvar at 10:32 PM on September 17


(Pizza) You grab that slice, and fold it over. That's a sandwich.

That’s a calzone. Which is admittedly a sandwich but it’s a specific subspecies of sandwich.
posted by Ryvar at 10:37 PM on September 17


My default is apple, brie, lettuce, and sweet chili jam, ideally on a really hole-filled, fluffy sourdough or a real croissant.

I sometimes revisit childhood and go with liverwurst, mustard, and cucomber. I've made pretty good artificial crab salad a few times in the last year. (Old Bay, or the surprisingly small number of ingredients in it, is key.) But mostly I just try to use up every random thing in the fridge that looks like it might be getting old. Always with something crunchy and usually something spicy. Bread is always toasted that's an option. Crusts are the good part. Ends are best.

I also realize now that I need to buy a bread knife. I also realize it's been a month since I've eaten bread. (I'll avoid commenting further on my complicated personal life. It's pretty good and getting better. But, also weirder than usual.)
posted by eotvos at 11:23 PM on September 17 [1 favorite]


BLT ! Blanched broccoli florets, limburger and tarragon with a smidge of mayo in a ciabatta bun.
posted by BobTheScientist at 12:44 AM on September 18


(I posit that a pizza, like a pie, is not a sandwich, as it is assembled with dough, not bread. The bread being pre-baked is part of the definition.)
posted by Dysk at 1:56 AM on September 18 [1 favorite]


Dysk: if that's the case, then is a peach tart an open-faced sandwich? (The crusts of many such fruit tarts are pre-baked.)
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 5:30 AM on September 18


winesong: Anything wrapped or on starch, kinda, is a sandwich
I'm in the camp of "arguing over terminology is not for me; not for me to impose on the conversation and maybe to invite wider chatter." You do you.

But please step away from my neck when wrapped in the starched collar of a pristine white shirt, you monster. :-P

We reheat cold pizza in paired sandwich slices. If you want extra Maillard reaction on the external bread, apply a modest amount of mayonnaise as you heat it through in a non-stick pan or iron skillet.

Bought Banh Mî on good French stick bread is a delight. Nod to Lalochezia.
posted by k3ninho at 5:39 AM on September 18


I'm currently eating a toasted sesame bagel with cream cheese and tomato, which is really good, but does not qualify as a "sandwich" in my opinion as it is open-faced. Also having a Bloody Mary and rejoicing in a personal-best time for the New York Times Sunday Crossword of 11:57 (to be fair, it was easy today, like really really easy, but still! 11:57! on a Sunday!)
posted by Daily Alice at 6:32 AM on September 18 [1 favorite]


if that's the case, then is a peach tart an open-faced sandwich? (The crusts of many such fruit tarts are pre-baked.)

It's part of the definition - necessary, but not sufficient.
posted by Dysk at 6:56 AM on September 18


(The crusts are rarely bread anyway, right?)
posted by Dysk at 6:56 AM on September 18


Rustica Special, Somerville MA
Former Masterpiece Deli, Braised brisket.
J.Pace, Park Lane.
Sam Lagrassa, Buffalo Mozzarella or eggplant.
posted by brent at 6:57 AM on September 18


Currently craving the out-of-season Pear & Bacon panini at Kerbey Lane in Austin: "Our spin on a classic grilled cheese: Pear & Bacon Panini. Sliced pear, bacon, aged white cheddar and garlic basil aioli on rustic Italian bread."
posted by gentlyepigrams at 9:49 AM on September 18 [1 favorite]


When I was in Vienna earlier this summer I was introduced to Schnittlauchbrot (Chives Bread), a concept so incredibly obvious I have no idea why I hadn't heard of it.

As in many things food-related, the ingredients are simple but the key is everything is high quality.

It's an open-faced sandwich consisting of:
  • Sliced rye bread
  • A spread of the best butter you can afford
  • Cover the entire sandwich with chives. As in *all* the chives, you should barely be able to see the butter. Grind some fresh pepper and salt on top.
After returning from Vienna, I've been kind of obsessing over making these this summer. Especially since chives are the sort of thing you get from CSA or buy for something else and are never quite sure how to use them all.

When the summer tomatoes started rolling in, I leveled up and added those. I may or may not have had a few days when this was both my lunch and dinner.
posted by jeremias at 9:55 AM on September 18 [2 favorites]


My favorite sandwich is when, right after Thanksgiving, I take two slices of crusty white bread, smear them with cold gravy, layer in dark turkey meat and stuffing, then assemble it, put it into a sandwich press on the lowest setting, and leave it until the bread is toasty brown and the contents are warm.
posted by DirtyOldTown at 10:23 AM on September 18 [4 favorites]


My favorite sandwich is squeezable peanut butter and cheese on a tortilla. I know. Gross. Crazy. Not even a sandwich, and certainly not a sandwich for grownups. That's because you can only enjoy this sandwich after hiking in the wilderness for 3 days, and they have to be grueling 12-14 hour days.

By the 4th day, you may be tired and in pain. The bread has to be a flour tortilla, because other breads become stale and/or fall apart in your backpack. Tortillas more or less hold up. (Under normal, non-backpacking, circumstances, I have opinions on flour tortillas. There are brands that are better. Homemade is probably best. But for backpacking I find that I don't care so much. Avoid tortillas that are too thin, because they will shred in your pack, but otherwise Americanized flour tortillas are fine. Maybe they actually work best? It's probably the preservatives.)

By the 4th day, you will be feeling pretty accomplished. That's a lot of hiking. Maybe you didn't think you could do it, but you did. The best peanut butter comes in little squeezable packages. They pack well, the trash weight is minimal, and they don't need a knife. I like Justins. I can get it with honey, or almond butter if I am feeling fancy.

By the 4th day, you will have eaten everything good that you brought. But you probably still have some cheese, and some tortillas. The most important characteristic about the cheese is that it can survive 4 unrefrigerated days in a backpack. Soft cheeses get too oily. I've tried Parmesan and it works, but a nice sharp cheddar is just about perfect. You may have already nibbled on it, but it's easy to bring enough.

By the 4th day, you will be hungry, tired, and filthy. You don't want to cook, maybe you can't take a lot of time to eat, and you crave fat, salt, and maybe a little bit of protein. Find yourself a spot with a view, maybe near a mountain pass. Get off the trail. Drop your pack, flop down. When you have recovered, take a minute make a sandwich. You can add other things. Sausage if you still have it. Pepperoni. Crumbs from those chips you ate on day one. Tuna? I don't know, you do you. I'm not going to judge. Enjoy the view, and the best sandwich you have ever had.
posted by surlyben at 10:42 AM on September 18 [4 favorites]


Muffuletta
Cheese Steak (Not a true Philly, though. Something with real cheese, like mozzarella, provolone, and parmesan, and topped with grilled onions, bell peppers, and jalapeños.)
Meatball sub
Bánh mì
Tuna melt with cheddar and tomato
Pulled pork
Reuben
Grilled cheese (with a mix of whatever tasty cheeses we have on hand)
So many others
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 11:00 AM on September 18 [2 favorites]


One of my fav comfort winter meal is a bowl of hot soup and a grilled cheese on challah bread. If I have the mayo I'll brown it in the pan and get that oh so good crunchy but still soft in the middle that Challah bread is so good at. The cheese needs to be the sharpest cheddar I can find. I'm so hungry now.
posted by ljesse at 11:00 AM on September 18 [2 favorites]


Arrrgh, I just missed a "should have been heretical and manipulative and bastard" moment. My game is rusty.

I was just out shopping and out in the parking lot stuffing things into my reusable bags as is normal. Some old Mexican (it's LA, the whole categorization between Mexican, Latino, Hispanic, etc. is a moot point and impossible to determine at first glance anyways.) stopped and for some reason offered me money. He might have been trying to pick me up or something, or thought I was homeless or something, but he was just holding out and offering me a few dollars. I waved him off all "don't want your money" like.

I should have taken it and paid it forward or something. Best intentions assumed, he was trying to give his change to someone. I didn't take it. I should have. He would have gone home knowing he did something good and decent (most likely) and I denied him that good deed by not taking his money. I could have taken it and paid it forward or something I could have completed the good deed intent. But I didn't. And it makes me a bit sad. I denied at least one, possibly two people from doing the right thing by not being the middle man.

Should have at least taken his money so he goes home having done a good deed.

I probably think too much.
posted by zengargoyle at 11:18 AM on September 18 [2 favorites]


Favorite sandwich? Hard to say. I like tuna on toast with lettuce and a touch of mayo. Or a BLT. But my favorite sandwich today will be for dinner.

Ricotta salata and smoked mozzarella on Italian bread with spicy mustard.
posted by Splunge at 1:50 PM on September 18


Think I'll toss it under the broiler for a few seconds. Brings out the smokiness of the mozz.
posted by Splunge at 1:59 PM on September 18


Pastrami Reuben from Kornblatts Deli in Portland. Unlike Daily Alice's experience, these folks know how to do it right. I don't get over that way too often, but every time I do I have to stop off and get one; I'm sure their other food is fantastic too but the Reuben is just so good I can't resist it!
posted by Greg_Ace at 4:58 PM on September 18


my family would make Statler sandwiches for dinner

And a Waldorf salad on the side?
posted by Greg_Ace at 4:58 PM on September 18 [1 favorite]


I looooove sandwitches. Favourite is probably grilled cheese on light rye with a mix of 2 cheeses, one sharp like cheddar, and a mellow like gruyère. bonus points if the gruyère is smoked.

Last night I was reading this thread, and neeeedeeeed a sammich, so I got inventive. Toasted sourdough with cheese, mayo, and a smattering of homemade coleslaw*. It was excellent

* I make a kickass coleslaw
posted by 5_13_23_42_69_666 at 5:03 PM on September 18


Recipe:

1 bag coleslaw veg (prechopped cabbage, red cabbage and carrot, not need to chop it yourself you have things to do)
2 - 3 quality pickles, finely chopped (strubbs full sour is the best)
1/3 a cup (ish) of mayo (or vegan mayo if you want to go vegan)
1 tbsp dijon
a few splashes of pickle juice, and whatever fancy vinegars you have on hand (but go really light on balsamic it'll overpower it)
1/4 cup chopped dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped almonds
salt, pepper, garlic powder

mix it up in a big bowl, stabbing at the cabbage with the spoon to break it up a bit. It's best prepared the day before you want to serve it, having a bit of time to soak blends the flavours and give the nuts a great texture. Leave it in the fridge overnight and stir it occasionally. Measurements are approximate, add more of anything you particularly like.
posted by 5_13_23_42_69_666 at 5:16 PM on September 18


The convenience/ice cream/snack shop in the student union in college had two offerings for vegetarians: American on white or wheat, or a pita spread inside with cream cheese and layered with roasted salted (shelled) sesame seeds, slices of tart green apple, and bean sprouts. I was not and am not a vegetarian but it was SO GOOD, it was a million miles better than any of their dry old turkey and ham sandwiches.

I also cannot not order anybody's Thanksgiving sandwich if it's on the menu. I realized ages ago hey, I could put cranberry sauce (or strawberry jam, which I always have) on any sandwich I want! But I rarely do. But I love a Thanksgiving special sandwich. When I make them myself, I mix leftover dressing with mashed potato and egg so I can make waffles out of that mix. You can make a two-waffle sandwich that way but I find it too think and disproportionate, you want this one served open face with gravy over it.

I was sitting here answering this question and thinking about muffulettas, but then that got me thinking about Schlotzky's, and damn I loved Schlotzky's growing up. They started getting hard to find in Texas when I was an adult, and then we moved to Southern California where there aren't any, but we're traveling for a year or two and I just checked their website and there is ONE store in Oregon, in Bend, and GUESS WHERE WE ARE LIVING THIS MONTH??!?? Damn it, we just got done running a bunch of errands and I can't justify going back out today, but soon. So soon. I should brace myself that their bread can't possibly be as good as it used to be.
posted by Lyn Never at 5:17 PM on September 18 [2 favorites]


Best sandwich in general? It’s like choosing among your children to decide who is the favourite. I suppose I have enjoyed my mom’s rendition of the humble tuna salad on a croissant because it reminds me of my childhood. And I have had many a fine eggplant sammidge from the incomparable Moustachio’s in St. Lawrence Market in Toronto.

Best individual sandwich EVAR was one I ate in Nova Scotia in 1995. Really, that was 27 years ago and nothing has surpassed it yet.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 5:39 PM on September 18 [1 favorite]


KISS: grilled cheese, with a side of tomato bisque.

You may use either butter or mayo, white or wheat sandwich bread, any sharp cheese or combination thereof. Cut diagonally or square, crust untrimmed or trimmed.

You may not add things to the grilled cheese sandwich as that would make it a grilled cheese and _______, which is not my favorite sandwich.

The tomato bisque is optional, but would be nice. I’m not particular about it - canned or fresh.

Im pretty bourgeois in my sandwich tastes. Sorry.
posted by JustSayNoDawg at 6:19 PM on September 18 [1 favorite]


I quite enjoy a good sandwich, unfortunately most of my favorites can no longer be had. No sandwich I will ever eat will match the quality of Eunah's work.

More recently I started quite enjoying the Italian Stallion sub at a deli around the corner but then the owner retired and the new owner is... not very good at running a deli. At all. To the point where I'll never set foot in there again so long as I live.
posted by majick at 6:53 PM on September 18 [1 favorite]


A cubano for me, please. (If it comes from Cafecito in Chicago along with a pitcher* of cuban coffee, I will be happy for the memories.)

*One grande cup
posted by Going To Maine at 7:26 PM on September 18 [4 favorites]


My signature sandwich came to life when I was 19 and I threw together what was in my parents’ fridge. Toasted Canadian white bread, each with a schmear of garlic hummus. Both slices of bread gets exactly nine pieces of pre sliced pepperoni, followed by six pieces of very thinly sliced cucumber. Add one slice of provolone cheese, join the bread slices, and smush down. I’m still eating it by choice 24 years later. The kid is hooked on it, too, although she cuts the cucumber thicker and in halves to fit the bread better. I prefer my cucumber slices translucent. It cuts up the roof of my mouth like Cap’n Crunch, but it’s peak comfort food for me.

My second favorite is baguette with Brie and butter, Twin Peaks style.
posted by Ruki at 8:16 PM on September 18 [1 favorite]


In about an hour or so I'm going down into the garage. This would, on any other day, be a total nonevent. People go into their garages all the time, right? Well, today is the day I go in there to see if running the incredibly illegal, probably unethical, definitely expensive ozone generator for another week did the thing I wanted it to do.

After the experience of the last couple of weeks, let me tell you I am totally off apple cider vinegar. Don't even like thinking about the stuff at this point. I'm pretty sure I am literally experiencing a very mild kind of trauma about apple cider vinegar with attendant avoidance behaviors, rumination, and other trauma-adjacent symptoms.

About apple cider vinegar.
posted by majick at 6:41 AM on September 19 [1 favorite]


I happen to favor the Hash Tag. A Hash Tag is a Tommy D with hash browns. A Tommy D is a chicken cutlet, bacon, egg and cheese. Can get on a roll or a wedge. But, really, anything from Rocky's specialty menu is killer. Open 24/7/365. Busiest times are the morning rush and midnight to 2am on a weekend. People come from all over Westchester and even Rockland counties. I drive 17 minutes to get there.
posted by JohnnyGunn at 7:23 AM on September 19 [2 favorites]


The one someone else makes for me. Yesterday my partner made me a cheddar and tomato on lightly toasted sourdough with mayo, s&p, and a little red onion. Glorious.

But more specifically, I still dream about a sandwich I only ever had in 1995 during a horrendous summer stock experience. Toasted sesame bagel, tuna salad, apple, cheddar, honey mustard. I have recreated it, but there must have been something specific in the tuna that I didn't match, and I don't really eat tuna salad anymore, so it remains a memory.
posted by wellred at 7:36 AM on September 19 [1 favorite]


I think it was maybe the Bon Appetit video, or possibly it was something in Tartine Bread, that turned me onto the idea that you could grill the (eventual) insides of the bread before flipping and filling the sandwich of a grilled (OPTIONAL: whatever and) cheese. I've been making sourdough basically every week for a couple years, and the sandwiches I make from this bread are so crisp and creamy and gooey that I sometimes feel like I'm maybe being too decadent, somehow. But then I remember I'm worth it. The character of the bread will change over the course of the week; sandwiches made early will have a light crispiness on the surface and maximum creaminess from the soft crumb; late in the week the crust will get loudly crunchy and the crumb will absorb more butter, and who doesn't love more butter?

So take two slices of sourdough, maybe about as thick as your index finger. Slice about 1½ ounces of sharp cheddar (or grate it; no wrong answers here). Warm a skillet (cast iron if you've got it; my cast iron develops richer browning than my nonstick griddle does) over medium heat and melt about half a tablespoon (a thick pat) of salted butter. When the butter stops bubbling, grill the (eventual) insides of the two slices of bread until GBD (on my stove, on medium, on cast iron, this is 85-90 seconds). As the bread grills, make sure you're swiping it around the pan to mop up as much of the butter as it'll absorb. Once the bread's a nice color, remove it from the pan and optionally spread (Duke's) mayonnaise on the grilled side. Melt another thick pat of butter, and when the foam subsides add the bread back to the skillet, un-grilled side down. Distribute the cheese in whatever way looks good. I like a thick slice because as it melts it will distribute itself, but grated cheese gives you the advantage that you can distribute it across both slices of bread and guarantee even coverage and melting, so you do you. Once the cheese starts to look a little soft (again, about 85-90 seconds on my stove) you can close up the two halves and flip the sandwich over a couple times to make sure the bread is evenly brown on both sides. I've been slicing these sort-of-diagonally in whatever way makes the two halves roughly the same size and crust-to-crumb ratio. If your diagonal is on too sharp an angle then one piece will end up with more crust than crumb, which is delicious, but it's not a balanced eating experience.

You can keep your plate of beans. I'm gonna overthink this sandwich.
posted by fedward at 9:46 AM on September 19 [3 favorites]


J. Kenji López-Alt may prefer these four variations, but I'm a sucker for a classic shooter's sandwich. Yes, a lot of the enjoyment is probably effort justification, but it makes for an enjoyable sandwich all the same.
posted by jedicus at 10:33 AM on September 19 [2 favorites]


My go to never get sick of it sandwich: pickles, salami, and mustard, ideally on pumpernickel.

My current favorite sandwich: roasted red pepper, artichoke hearts, spinach, and a little red onion. Toss in a light vinegarette, then roll it all up in a wrap that's been smeared with some goat cheese or hummus.
posted by ghost phoneme at 1:10 PM on September 19 [1 favorite]


My favorite sandwiches that someone else makes are probably (i) any sandwich mrs. slkinsey makes for me, because there's just something special about a sandwich made as an expression of love; (ii) pastrami and mustard on a hero at Katz's Delicatessen; (iii) the extremely elusive chicken parm hero of quality.

The "house favorite" of the slkinsey household that I make is fried mortadella, broccoli rabe sauteed with garlic until soft and smoked mozzarella layered inside a split ciabatta and then griddled under weight until it's crispy on the outside and melty on the inside.
posted by slkinsey at 2:30 PM on September 19 [3 favorites]


It's been a long time now since I've spent time on that side of the country, and maybe they aren't nearly as good as in my memories, but I really, really loved the sub sandwiches at Wegmans.

I haven't found a sandwich place here that I like very much, other than bahn mi which are uniformly excellent, but I live in hope and just a few days ago spotted a little place in a strip mall that I want to try.
posted by Dip Flash at 5:32 PM on September 19 [1 favorite]


Italian sandwich, Maine version.
BLT with nice thick bacon, plenty of mayo, a couple slices of avocado are nice.
Roast beef, horseradish, mayo, pickled onions, romaine.
Reuben from a decent deli, though I am a Philistine who does not like rye, so I ask for wheat bread.
Muffaletta, ideally in New Orleans.

I love sandwiches. I left out lobster rolls, or the subs at Cassano's, which I hope still have banana peppers on them(I checked, they do). The humble egg salad. Breakfast sandwiches. Now I'm hungry, but too lazy to make tuna salad and toast an English muffin, the only bread in the house.
posted by theora55 at 10:08 PM on September 19 [2 favorites]


I can tell you about my least favorite sandwich. I had a long drive yesterday evening, and stopped at a service station to grab a quick bite for dinner. But most of the options were already closed, and so I just grabbed a rather dubious tuna sandwich from a convenience store. This morning I am suffering the results of my gamble. So that tuna sandwich, specifically, is currently my least favorite.
posted by biogeo at 6:49 AM on September 20 [3 favorites]


At least you didn't opt for an egg salad sandwich!
posted by Greg_Ace at 8:34 AM on September 20 [2 favorites]


I don't think of it as a sandwich, but I have been eating rice cakes with hummus and arugula, and it's a great combination of flavor and texture. and takes a minute to assemble a few for a fast meal.
posted by theora55 at 12:28 PM on September 20


Currently creamed tuna on toast, (which is an open faced sandwich of slop), and boring hot dogs. Or my usual Potato bun, mustard(s), smoked turkey or salami, cheddar and habenjero jack cheese, jalapeños and/or pickles.

Good sammich.

Wish I liked the odd herbs and avocado more. Some of these sound delicious up to a point….
posted by Windopaene at 4:02 PM on September 20


The egg salad sandwich is my second favorite sandwich. Eggs, mayo, bit of mustard on mayo’d and toasted sandwich bread.

Third would be a PBJ on toasted sandwich bread.
posted by JustSayNoDawg at 5:41 PM on September 20 [1 favorite]


Chip butty!
posted by pompomtom at 6:39 PM on September 20 [3 favorites]


The best sandwich I ever made, I made out of what I had on hand, and I still think about it. Sliced turkey, Havarti cheese, bean sprouts and raspberry mustard in a pita pocket.

My favorite grilled cheese: Duke's mayo smeared on the outside of each bread slice, shredded Cotswold and a little dollop of whatever grainy mustard is on hand.
posted by emelenjr at 8:34 PM on September 20 [1 favorite]


Anxiety sandwich:
Air dried truffle sausage from Waitrose
Jarlsberg cheese
Dijon mustard
Rocket
Butter
Baguette (a proper nice authentic baguette)
posted by The Last Sockpuppet at 5:51 AM on September 21


I've been appreciating the end of tomato season here, with inspiration from Kenji Lopez-Alt's simple but satisfying tomato sandwich (5 min video, toast/mayo/ripe tomato/salt)
posted by LobsterMitten (staff) at 1:45 PM on September 21


- peanut butter, sambal (Indonesian chilli sauce) and cucumber
- peanut butter & banana slices


So many good peanut butter suggestions, to almost all of which I'd add cheese. I always make them open-face: toast the bread, spread the PB (just peanuts), put a slice of sharp cheddar on it and then broil for a minute in the toaster oven until the cheese just starts to melt, then top with sliced cukes, bananas, berries, grapes or some other fruit. Adding chili sauce to the cuke version sounds wonderful, thanks!
posted by mediareport at 2:30 PM on September 21


Chicken satay sandwiches (makes two):
sliced bread (I frequently use Vietnamese baguettes instead, cut in half)
1/2 cup peanut butter
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons brown sugar
circa 2tsp lime juice (A fresh lime is best, but store-bought lime juice will do).
Fresh cilantro stems removed (quantity according to taste)
Sliced red onion (quantity according to taste)
Handful of bean sprouts (these are optional)
handful of leftover rotisserie chicken
1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger root
Butter or margarine

Directions
Step 1: Assemble the ingredients and pop a skillet onto your stove top (if using panini press, skip this, see below).

Step 2: Measure 2 teaspoons of soy sauce into a small cup or bowl. Add about 2 teaspoons of lime juice. Set aside.

Step 3: Scoop 1/2 cup of peanut butter into a bowl. Add soy sauce and lime juice to the peanut butter. Grate about 1 tablespoon of fresh ginger root to the mix and stir it up. The peanut butter will get clumpy and form a firm ball. Don't worry -- place the mixture into the microwave for about 20 seconds to soften.

Step 4: Spread half of the peanut butter mixture onto one slice of bread and the other half onto another. Add sliced red onion and chicken.

Step 5: Next, add your cilantro leaves and top it all off with your bean sprouts, if using.

Step 6: Top your sandwich with the remaining bread, and spread a small amount of butter or margarine (or vegan spread) on top.

Step 7: Add a small pat of butter to your skillet and turn the flame on to medium low. Allow the butter to melt and place the sandwich on top of the melted butter, butter side up. Cook until browned, about 4 minutes, then flip it over and cook the other side for 4 minutes.

ALTERNATIVE if using Vietnamese baguettes; panini-press the whole affair. Or even skip entirely.

Step 8: Cut the sandwich in half, serve.

You may, of course, skip the chicken in which case the bean sprouts become more necessary.
posted by aramaic at 6:00 PM on September 21 [3 favorites]


Toast with a light layer of honey and two fried eggs.
posted by dobbs at 6:04 PM on September 21


I’m dying to try a Fluffernutter, but I’m pretty sure my busted-ass pancreas would forever-shit the bed.
posted by JustSayNoDawg at 9:33 PM on September 21


Whole wheat tortillas on the griddle with a spritz of olive oil, soy chorizo sauteed until done with garlic, cream cheese on the grilling tortillas, hot chorizo goes on, then mashed together into a quesodilla, cut with a pizza roller into 8 pieces on the grill, served with Trader Joe's Red Pepper and Garlic Spread to dip, coffee to go with! Breakfast.
posted by Oyéah at 11:00 PM on September 21 [1 favorite]


Monte Cristo; unfortunately I've only had it made for me, but it is something I'd like to try making myself at some point.
posted by Aleyn at 11:34 PM on September 21


The Scuttlebutt is the queen who reigns over the land of sandwiches. Saltie closed (so sad!) but the recipe is still out there. Yes, it sounds weird. But it's easily the greatest sandwich I've ever had.
posted by rocketman at 5:40 AM on September 22


Martin Burgers is the next recipe I want to try. But banh mi has a place in my heart.
posted by Wrinkled Stumpskin at 6:14 AM on September 22


Unexpected but amazing: this sandwich with slices of roasted sweet potato, pickled beets, lemony arugula, goat cheese, and garlic mayo. A pub near me also does a vegetarian version of the classic Reuben, replacing the corned beef with smashed sweet potato wedges, and it's incredible.
posted by SeedStitch at 7:23 AM on September 22 [1 favorite]


A slice of toast, mayo, fresh garden tomato and black pepper.
posted by Brian B. at 8:56 AM on September 22 [1 favorite]


Agreed, but highly recommend adding salt. And eat it over the sink!
posted by Greg_Ace at 9:46 AM on September 22 [2 favorites]


Oddly, I like calzones and strombolis better than I like pizza.

Chicken salad or a quarter muffaletta for me. A real muffaletta is a giant round sandwich, about the size of a small pizza. It's way to much.

A good chicken salad (no fruit in the chicken salad) is what I get when I've had too many muffalettas. Chicken salad, lettuce, tomatoes, maybe a white cheese on wheat or multigrain type bread.

I still eat a lot of sandwiches, both ones I make at home and get out at restaurants.
posted by The_Vegetables at 1:37 PM on September 22 [1 favorite]


More years ago now than I care to count, I briefly worked at Neal's Yard Dairy, and on my first shift, another cheesemonger made sandwiches out of slices of an heirloom apple that I cannot recall the name of, as well as a fresh ash-covered goat cheese on some slices of crusty wholemeal bread. That was it. That was the whole sandwich, and it was a taste experience I have never been able to recreate.
posted by gauche at 1:53 PM on September 22 [3 favorites]


I don’t eat a lot of sandwiches, and when I do, I kind of stay trad.
I loves me a good reuben. And, trust me, there are some horrible excuses for a reuben out there (I’m looking at you, Syd’s)

After that, I’ve developed a solid love for cubans. Another one that can be done very poorly.

When I go really traditional, I go for the good old pbj. I make it with Dave’s Killer 21-Grain bread. So good.

In the spirit of “is it a sandwich?” I propose carnitas and a stack of griddled corn tortillas is several sandwiches just waiting to happen.
posted by Thorzdad at 5:42 PM on September 22 [1 favorite]


Ratatouille sandwich!

The process is simple: make the absolute best ratatouille that you can, making sure to cook it in a way that minimizes sloppiness/wetness. While it's cooling down, take a little bit of softened, unsalted butter, a bunch of goat cheese, some finely chopped herbs (I'm partial to basil, tarragon, and chives) and salt and pepper to taste and whip together to form an easily spreadable paste.

Get the best sandwich or hoagie roll you can, cut it down the middle, spread both sides with cheese/butter mixture, stuff with ratatouille, and fuckin buckle up friend cause you're on a rocket ship to flavor town.
posted by saladin at 6:19 AM on September 23


Monte Cristo... is something I'd like to try making myself at some point.

Way easier to do with slices of French toast, rather than dipping it in batter and deep-fat-frying, Blue Bayou style.
posted by Rash at 8:28 AM on September 23 [1 favorite]


I love me a good sandwich, but am burned out on buying and keeping bread and all the fixins at home. (Bread goes bad too quickly in my warm kitchen.) I love a freshly made burger or a cubano or turkey reuben or fried chicken cutlet with slaw and pickles, the latter of which is my go-to at work. There’s a burger place next door and that’s my usual and they walk it to the back door of my shop and it makes me feel very warm and fuzzy.

Just this week I introduced my brother to pb and banana. Mind blown!
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 9:39 AM on September 23 [1 favorite]


Since someone mentioned the Croque Monsieur/Monte Cristo far above, I will counter with a similar Portuguese invention, the Francesinha. Note that this recipe uses a non-Portuguese cheese, which is a reasonable substitute and much easier to find globally.

Be warned: this sandwich will destroy you. The last time I had one, it was literally the only thing I ate that entire day and I still couldn't finish the whole thing.

If you survive the encounter, consider a bifana for your next meal.
posted by aramaic at 11:26 AM on September 23 [3 favorites]


I guess at some point I should try making Mallorca rolls so I can recreate this sandwich we had in Puerto Rico.
posted by fedward at 1:51 PM on September 23 [1 favorite]


It's hard to beat a good BLT on sourdough. I prefer thin sliced Applewood smoked bacon, generously mounded on bread toasted in the bacon fat, topped with fresh from the garden tomates and lettuce, and a good squeeze of Kewpie mayo, possibly enhanced with finely chopped basil.

The most unique sandwich I had was at a restaurant in Richmond, VA. It was open-face, consisting of two large slices of lightly toasted Italian bread, topped with crab dip (the decadent kind with cream cheese, mayo, green onion, horseradish and worstershire sauce), layered with tomatoes and topped with Monterey jack cheese, and broiled brown on top. Very decadent and possibly not technically a sandwich. Still worth a mention though.
posted by ananci at 12:03 PM on September 25


Grilled peanut butter and banana on some chewey white bread.
OR any sandwich my wife makes for me. I dunno, home cooking, man.
posted by charlesminus at 6:34 PM on September 25


I tend to only eat hot sandwiches, which I think play better with my texture issues than cold sandwiches… the exception is, bizarrely, tuna fish, which I get an inextinguishable craving for once a year.

We did make Ali Slagle’s bodega style breakfast sandwiches today, subbing out ciabatta rolls for Kaiser rolls (which were not available) and cheddar instead of American (at the request of my partner) and they were *perfection.*
posted by honeybee413 at 8:16 PM on September 25


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