Tagged! March 27, 2006 10:49 PM   Subscribe

Someone added tags to my post. I'll wear the 'obit' and 'obituary' but the '.' has to go. When I try to delete it i get "Looks like you're trying to delete tags fromto the wrong post. Go ."
posted by tellurian to Bugs at 10:49 PM (78 comments total)

.
posted by shnoz-gobblin at 11:30 PM on March 27, 2006


that's an obitch, man.
posted by Hat Maui at 11:43 PM on March 27, 2006 [1 favorite]


"Either the '.' goes or I do."
Paraphrased from Oscar Wilde's apocryphal last words.
We miss you, Oscar.
.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 11:47 PM on March 27, 2006


tellurian, the dot bothers you that much? Really?

Wow.
posted by fenriq at 12:07 AM on March 28, 2006


i think the dot should stay since it's such a mefi staple. but it should be called "dot" not "."

when you click on the "." tag, it doesn't display the posts marked with it, probably because it tries "%2E" in the url.
posted by freudianslipper at 12:16 AM on March 28, 2006


I hear you tellurian. I've half a mind to learn how to write Greasemonkey scripts just so I can make one that replaces comments containing a lonely '.' with 'THIS USER IS A SIMPERING WHIMSY-PILLOCK'. Does my fucking head in, that dot thing.
posted by jack_mo at 1:58 AM on March 28, 2006


It's a useless tag and I didn't put it there.
posted by tellurian at 2:01 AM on March 28, 2006


AND I can't remove the tag AND the error message makes no sense, hence the 'bugs' category.
posted by tellurian at 2:31 AM on March 28, 2006


jack_mo: .
posted by grouse at 2:53 AM on March 28, 2006


"." doesn't even work as a tag. Why would [whoever] do somethin' like that?
posted by Gator at 3:00 AM on March 28, 2006


For reasons that I don't fully understand, I always associate the dot thing with Alex Reynolds. It makes me think of somebody starting out calm and collected, then succumbing to a spontaneous personality meltdown.

I do miss Alex, and his funny little ways.
posted by veedubya at 3:09 AM on March 28, 2006



posted by loquacious at 3:24 AM on March 28, 2006


"." doesn't even work as a tag. Why would [whoever] do somethin' like that?
posted by Gator at 3:00 AM PST on March 28 [!]

Quite.
posted by tellurian at 3:33 AM on March 28, 2006


I don't. And we don't need yet another thread about alex.
posted by adamvasco at 3:33 AM on March 28, 2006


i think the dot should stay since it's such a mefi staple. but it should be called "dot" not "."

Then where will we go with all the EastEnders posts??

</uk>
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane at 3:38 AM on March 28, 2006


hey. that's my dot you got.
posted by quonsar at 3:57 AM on March 28, 2006 [1 favorite]


I removed it. I usually make sure there are the tags obit, obituary and (because it's been convention in some past obituary threads) I'd been adding the dot to "soandso died" threads.
posted by jessamyn (staff) at 4:11 AM on March 28, 2006


So now there's a call-out/flameout about dots? Soon it's going to be like a show about nothing!
posted by keijo at 4:45 AM on March 28, 2006


jessamyn – I get it, but the dot doesn't work so you might want to drop that practice. If you add a tag for whatever reason does the poster not have the option of removing it?
Aside: Do you realise the implications of the phrase "so and so" to a British speaking person?
posted by tellurian at 4:46 AM on March 28, 2006


Do you realise the implications of the phrase "so and so" to a British speaking person?

no, do tell.
posted by jessamyn (staff) at 4:51 AM on March 28, 2006


Oh! and I liked very much that the error message ends "Go ." when I was trying to delete '.'
posted by tellurian at 4:52 AM on March 28, 2006


Jesus Christ. Some people are too thin-skinned for the internet.
posted by cribcage at 4:52 AM on March 28, 2006 [1 favorite]


"so and so" - a person who is deemed to be despicable or contemptible; "only a rotter would do that"; "kill the rat"; "throw the bum out"; "you cowardly little pukes!"; "the British call a contemptible person a "so and so git"
posted by tellurian at 4:55 AM on March 28, 2006


cribcage - it's in bugs, not etiquette.
posted by tellurian at 4:57 AM on March 28, 2006


Back in the 40's and 50's, when people weren't allowed to curse in the movies or on television, you'd hear "Phil is a dirty so-and-so."
posted by crunchland at 5:00 AM on March 28, 2006


Back in the 40's and 50's, when people weren't allowed to curse in the movies
Or in my grandmother's house.
posted by tellurian at 5:04 AM on March 28, 2006


jessamyn - calling someone a 'so-and-so' can be mildly rude, as in 'That jessamyn, she's a cheeky little so-and-so!'. Roughly equivalent to calling someone a 'sod', maybe a bit milder. The way you used it meaning 'someone-or-other' works for us speakers of English English too, though.

Er, 'sod' probably isn't widely used in America either, eh? Can't think of a mildly rude American equivalent. Do Americans even do mildly rude, or do you just veer from 'have a nice day' to 'motherfucker' with no points inbetween? ;-)


So now there's a call-out/flameout about dots?


I honestly think that the dot thing is the only thing that could provoke a MeTa wig-out on my part. Maybe I'll get leathered next time a minor sleb snuffs it and go on a hate-filled anti-dot rampage.
posted by jack_mo at 5:05 AM on March 28, 2006 [1 favorite]


My grandmother also used to say "kinhell" and when pulled up on it would say "Nobody knows what I'm saying".
posted by tellurian at 5:08 AM on March 28, 2006


May I just let you all know that I had the best grandmother EVER. She ran the best pub in the village. Pickled eggs. Doorstop cheese sandwiches. Dartboard. Piano. Shuffleboard. Open fires. As much tick as her customers needed. Dice. Cryptic crossword solvers. Chalk cellar. Ramblers on weekends. Full vegetable garden. Tomato greenhouse. SP bookie. Dripping sandwiches. She had a funny finger she caught in a mangle when she was a child. AND she hated wearing her teeth.
posted by tellurian at 5:34 AM on March 28, 2006


"so and so" has been a staple since my childhood. Whatever will I use if I move to England?

I hope someone puts together a website of equivalent swear words. I always thought "sod" was closer to an American "fuck."
posted by ?! at 5:36 AM on March 28, 2006


"bloody" is apparently a lot closer to "fuck" than I ever used to think it is.

I had no idea about so-and-so, though. It sounds about as offensive as 'darn' or 'crap'. e.g. "Heck, get that darn crap out of here, you so-and-so."

Shit.
posted by blacklite at 5:46 AM on March 28, 2006


You have a small problem with 'sod' as it can be interpreted as:
1. A sodomite.
2. A person regarded as obnoxious or contemptible.
But it was always okay in my grandmothers pub, as in: "silly sod threw a dart and hit the piano instead of the dartboard", go figure.
posted by tellurian at 5:48 AM on March 28, 2006


Randy and Fanny go to England...
posted by eriko at 5:53 AM on March 28, 2006


tellurian, the dot bothers you that much? Really?

Look, some people get really irritable when the period comes around.
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 6:03 AM on March 28, 2006


bahdoompah.
posted by crunchland at 6:04 AM on March 28, 2006


Note: There is no implication that their sexual preferences caused their lack of aim, my grandmother probably gave them too much tick.
?! – Go here.
posted by tellurian at 6:06 AM on March 28, 2006


"Sod" is like "fuck" when used in the phrase "sod off."
posted by Astro Zombie at 6:09 AM on March 28, 2006


MetaFilter: From 'have a nice day' to 'motherfucker' with no points inbetween.
posted by Faint of Butt at 6:15 AM on March 28, 2006 [1 favorite]


Metafilter: from 'have a nice day' to 'motherfucker' with no points in between

Sorry; couldn't resist
posted by TedW at 6:18 AM on March 28, 2006


Damn you, Faint of Butt!!!
posted by TedW at 6:18 AM on March 28, 2006


Or "Bugger off"
And then you have "Bugger me" or "Sod me". But these are all sardonic, yes?
posted by tellurian at 6:21 AM on March 28, 2006


i've never heard "sod me".

"bugger me" is an expression of surprise. i'm not sure it's particularly sardonic, but it's certainly not a direct order.
posted by andrew cooke at 6:30 AM on March 28, 2006


"Look, some people get really irritable when the period comes around."

[this thread is closed to new comments]
posted by mr_crash_davis at 6:38 AM on March 28, 2006


i've never heard "sod me".
posted by andrew cooke

I'll admit it is quintessetially British.
posted by tellurian at 6:48 AM on March 28, 2006


In the spirit of this post, I can only add that I think the . is a so and so.
posted by bluesky43 at 6:51 AM on March 28, 2006


The URLs for tag pages need a rework. We keep tripping over tags like ".htaccess" and ".") that break parts of the infrastructure.
posted by Mitheral at 7:42 AM on March 28, 2006


"so and so" has been a staple since my childhood. Whatever will I use if I move to England?

You can still use it in the American 'someone-or-other' sense too - depends on context.

"bloody" is apparently a lot closer to "fuck" than I ever used to think it is.

Nowhere near - you could say 'bloody' in front of a vicar without her batting an eyelid. 'Fuck', not so much.

You have a small problem with 'sod' as it can be interpreted as:
1. A sodomite.


That's pretty archaic, though, no? Only a Telegraph-reading, monocled former Sargeant-Major from the Home Counties would use it that way, I imagine.

Er, sorry, to go on. I always enjoy these occasional hands across the ocean language threads derails. Also, tellurian - your Nan sounds like she was a truly fabulous lady. I want a dripping sandwich for my tea.

And bugger me, I don't think I've been bloody taglined before. It's quite the sodding honour.
posted by jack_mo at 7:45 AM on March 28, 2006


This is a much better thread than I thought it was going to be from the title.
posted by CRM114 at 8:14 AM on March 28, 2006


tellurian
adj : willfully and perniciously obtuse; totally uninformed about what is going on; not having even a clue from which to infer what is occurring; having no motivation to even wonder
posted by y6y6y6 at 8:19 AM on March 28, 2006


don't forget my favorite WWII euphemism. "We gave Gerry a good rogering last night". Poor Roger.
posted by blue_beetle at 8:28 AM on March 28, 2006


jack_mo: "Er, 'sod' probably isn't widely used in America either, eh? Can't think of a mildly rude American equivalent. Do Americans even do mildly rude, or do you just veer from 'have a nice day' to 'motherfucker' with no points inbetween? ;-)"

Sure we do. DoubleSpeak, ad homonym, political correctness, etc. Although I do recall that the last time I called someone a "sycophantic git, worthy only of defenestration," I was met with some blank stares.
posted by mystyk at 8:47 AM on March 28, 2006


It's Jerry, not Gerry, you silly so-and-so. (Fritz, the Krauts or the Bosch would do in that sentence too. I am rather apalled that I know so many slurs for 'Germans'. Don't mention the war, etc.)
posted by jack_mo at 8:54 AM on March 28, 2006


On non-preview: Sure we do. DoubleSpeak, ad homonym, political correctness, etc.

Yeah, but that's not quite the same as having insults and curses that can be used in polite company, like 'bloody', 'sod', 'so-and-so', &c. - what's an American English word that is a few notches below 'crap' on the offensiveness scale? (Assuming 'poo' is 0 and 'cunt' is 10, 'crap' is probably around a 3.2.)

And Yanks1 say 'git'? Didn't know that. Or they don't, hence the blank stares?

1. No offence, like. Just continuing the '40s slang theme.
posted by jack_mo at 9:01 AM on March 28, 2006


Er, the only git we use is "git along, little doggie."
posted by crunchland at 9:09 AM on March 28, 2006


Yeah, git as a noun is not a US term.
posted by languagehat at 9:24 AM on March 28, 2006


I find it kinda funny - and endearingly, quintesentially British - that there should be insults and curses for use in polite company.

I'm afraid that this Canadian's gonna have to side with them thar ugly Amuuricans: If you're gonna fucking swear, you may as well make it goddamwell count and not sound like some fucking twelve year old priss shithead.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 9:40 AM on March 28, 2006


Okay, so now I know sod is short for sodomite; where does 'git' come from?

And for all his complaining, I haven't seen tellurian use so-and-so unmodified:

"so and so git" - where 'git' is the insult: Read as "git-type-person"
"she's a cheeky little so-and-so" - where 'cheeky' reveals your opinion of her: Read as: "cheeky person"

So maybe you're inferring a meaning that's not there? I've never seen so-and-so used without being modified ("John is a so-and-so."), though if it is, I assume that the intonation would reveal whether it was uttered in contempt or not. Intonation can make the most neutral of utterances an insult. I guess if you've only heard it used as an insult, you don't know that by itself it has no negative connotation.

Excellent derail! Would read again!
posted by Eideteker at 9:52 AM on March 28, 2006


where does 'git' come from?

It's an alteration of get 'What is begotten; an offspring, child' (OED). (Just as git in git along, little dogie is an alteration of the verb get.
posted by languagehat at 10:18 AM on March 28, 2006


)
posted by languagehat at 10:19 AM on March 28, 2006


jessamyn - calling someone a 'so-and-so' can be mildly rude...

She has no respect for the swear jar either.
posted by y2karl at 10:25 AM on March 28, 2006


Yeah, git as a noun is not a US term.

I have used it only mildy selfconciously, and heard it used apparently totally unselfconciously by a couple of native US non-linguaphiles, so perhaps it is making some early inroads.

I hope so. It's a great word.
posted by cortex at 10:51 AM on March 28, 2006


"Git" as a noun strikes me as Southern.

A notch or two below "crap"? "Bastard," maybe. "Ass."
posted by kindall at 11:02 AM on March 28, 2006


Can't think of a mildly rude American equivalent. Do Americans even do mildly rude, or do you just veer from 'have a nice day' to 'motherfucker' with no points inbetween? ;-)

Sir.
Mister.
Buddy.
Dude.
Hey, you.
Jerk.
Punkass.
Dumbass.
Asshole.
Dick.


Motherfucker.

Motherfucker.
posted by linux at 11:45 AM on March 28, 2006


Yes, but "fuck" is not always negative in the South (U.S.).

As in "Fucking A, Skippy" and "unfuckingbeliveable"

Thanks for the list of words tellurian, but I still would like to see a site listing swear words on a 0-12 scale and grouped by region. I have a hard time remembering how offended I should be when some people curse at me.
posted by ?! at 12:32 PM on March 28, 2006


cortex writes "Yeah, git as a noun is not a US term.

"I have used it only mildy selfconciously, and heard it used apparently totally unselfconciously by a couple of native US non-linguaphiles, so perhaps it is making some early inroads."


It is known and used if not common in Canada. It could be our secret agents giving themselves away.
posted by Mitheral at 1:05 PM on March 28, 2006


Eh?
posted by cortex at 1:17 PM on March 28, 2006


"Git" as a noun strikes me as Southern.

You mean Southern England? Because I know southern Americans, and I've never heard any of them use this term, which is unquestionably UK (every single citation in the OED is Brit).
posted by languagehat at 1:18 PM on March 28, 2006


strikes him as vs. is, lhat. Which isn't that weird, since "git" for "get" seems like a (pop-culture) Southernism.
posted by cortex at 1:22 PM on March 28, 2006


It's southern in that the verb 'get' is pronounced 'git' by many southern english speakers. That's certainly different, though, than the Brit usage of the noun 'git.'
posted by monju_bosatsu at 1:24 PM on March 28, 2006


Maybe I'm just going senile, but yeah, I could have sworn "git" was common vernacular in the southern US and pretty much synonymous with the British use.
posted by kindall at 2:30 PM on March 28, 2006


Which isn't that weird, since "git" for "get" seems like a (pop-culture) Southernism.

As a verb, sure. But the comment was specifically:
"Git" as a noun strikes me as Southern.

I could have sworn "git" was common vernacular in the southern US and pretty much synonymous with the British use.


Well, I haven't actually been in the South in a coon's age, and usage may have changed. But I'm curious to know where your impression comes from. If from the horse's mouth, I'll be happy to retract. But I'm guessing you're mixing up the noun and the verb.
posted by languagehat at 2:47 PM on March 28, 2006


g'wan, git!
posted by cortex at 3:09 PM on March 28, 2006


It mostly comes from my father, who I could have sworn I've heard use the word at least once. He grew up in southern Ohio, which is culturally basically part of West Virginia.

I'm probably just imagining it, though, because I can't pull a concrete memory of a time he actually said it from my addled brain.
posted by kindall at 4:02 PM on March 28, 2006


<blink>

.

</blink>
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane at 4:49 PM on March 28, 2006


After spending so long with the people that they've come to accept me as one of their own I can report that none of the Southern tribes I've lived with use the word "git" in any way other than to mean "get."

I have also found that run-on sentences help me stave off being interrupted when Yankees fans take my Southern pauses as meaning I'm finished speaking.

No, I have no idea why I'm doing it now.
posted by ?! at 7:35 PM on March 28, 2006


I've never seen so-and-so used without being modified ("John is a so-and-so."), though if it is, I assume that the intonation would reveal whether it was uttered in contempt or not.

Yeah, it does tend to be modified - eg. 'She's a right so-and-so, that one' - and 'John is a so-and-so' is less common, I'd've thought, though folk would still know what you meant if you said that. Also, I suspect this usage is dying out - I use it only occasionally, my Mom uses it a lot, my Nan even more, and I doubt a teenager would ever say it...

g'wan, git!

There's a large Jamaican community in the Southern states of America? ;-)
posted by jack_mo at 4:39 AM on March 29, 2006


Do Americans even do mildly rude, or do you just veer from 'have a nice day' to 'motherfucker' with no points inbetween? ;-) - jack_mo

This is true for a subset of Americans, absolutely.
posted by raedyn at 8:22 AM on March 29, 2006


In fact, in New York, "Have a nice day, motherfucker" is a perfectly good sentence.
posted by languagehat at 8:53 AM on March 29, 2006


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