Vaccination Success Stories February 12, 2021 11:16 PM   Subscribe

Did you get vaccinated against COVID-19? That's awesome! Hearing about that is awesome and reassuring. Did your mom get vaccinated? Your dad? Your grandparents? Your kid? Your partner? Your sibling? Pass it all on. It's all good news. It's good you got the jab! Be well. Tide those of us still waiting over with your story. We want to know!
posted by DirtyOldTown to MetaFilter-Related at 11:16 PM (109 comments total) 4 users marked this as a favorite

My mother has already received her first dose and will be getting her second in a few weeks. I also have other relatives who've received their vaccines (one works in a school). I have no idea when I'll be eligible since I'm pretty much at the end of the queue but I do have hope that it may be sooner than I thought it would be even just a month ago. I'm crossing my fingers that it might even be my turn by the end of March but more likely April/May.
posted by NotTheRedBaron at 11:33 PM on February 12 [3 favorites]


My in-laws get their vaccines today! My parents are in a different country and aren't eligible yet, but fingers crossed it's available soon.

I hopefully should be in the next priority group in my state. Kudos to everyone online that has been providing resources to help get appointments, it's a huge help.
posted by cozenedindigo at 11:49 PM on February 12 [3 favorites]


My parents got theirs last week by waiting in a parking lot for leftovers at a health center in Texas. Well, my dad did, and there was one vial left and they had sent everyone waiting home, and my dad was like “what is THAT” and they said it was a single remaining dose, and he was like “my wife!!!” And my mom, who is a year and a half younger and therefor way down on the list, but who was the only person left, got the last dose of the night. So my dad got my mom vaccinated by being a wife guy, I guess. Later that night they called to share the news and I accidentally got on a tear about how incarcerated people should be some of the earliest to get vaccinated and had kind of a yelling not-fight with my dad about the moral neutrality of the body but like, I’m glad my parents got their vaccines.
posted by Mizu at 12:05 AM on February 13 [17 favorites]


Because I'm a health care worker, I got my second dose a few weeks ago. It was rather unremarkable (some body ache, elevated temp but no fever, tired, arm hurt) as far as vaccines go, I've definately had worse flu shot reactions. My first dose was worse than the second, but that is rumored to be true for people who have had COVID so that tracks for my suspected history.

Anyway 10/10 would do again. Its a relief in some ways, and I'm looking forward to way more people getting vaccinated. I will happily
praise this vaccine to the end of time.
posted by AlexiaSky at 12:42 AM on February 13 [7 favorites]


Thanks to the perseverance of one of my daughters who tracked down an appointment for me I received the first dose last Sunday. Two of my granddaughters drove me in my car just in case any thing went wrong. The site was a drive-by at a Portland airport parking lot which had many volunteers holding signs and directing traffic. We were about a half hour early, but they sent us right in. Admirable job of organization!
I was probably the oldest patient ever for the shot giver who was a pediatrician from OHSU (Oregon Health Sciences University).
I was given a card and an appointment time for dose two next month. My arm was sore for a couple of days so best advice is: get the shot in your non-dominant arm.
Chaos was expected on Monday when a new category of candidates opened. Then the horrid ice and sleet and snow storm hit. All vaccine sites closed along with universities, etc.
I was extremely lucky time-wise.
posted by Cranberry at 1:18 AM on February 13 [5 favorites]


As a relatively young person living in literally the worst vaccine-distribution state in the country, I wasn't too optimistic. Even being in the coveted phase 1b (public-facing essential workers) didn't seem to help, since for the longest time they only opened it to the politically influential police-and-retirees portion over the other job classes in the group. But as soon as eligibility was expanded, I went straight for my local hospital site, and after resubmitting a lengthy application 10+ times (thanks to a wonky calendar widget that kept offering time slots that weren't actually available), I finally snagged an appointment for the 16th... of March. Checking the state health department site showed bookings taken all the way through June.

But I kept an eye out for new opportunities, and when I heard Walmart and Sam's Club would be distributing doses, I bookmarked their pages and checked back daily. Finally just the other day I secured a spot... for next week! And not a moment too soon, since I just recovered from a bad cold (COVID test negative) that has seriously shaken confidence in my mask game. Just ~3-4 weeks to go until I can give anti-maskers a regular death-glare instead of a fearful one.

Downer note though: both my elderly grandmother and her primary caregiver, my mom (who blithely continues to running her very non-essential paint-and-sip classes), sound like they're going to refuse vaccination on nebulous Trumpy/plandemic/anti-vax grounds. I'd ask if anybody has any good ideas to persuade them, but if their own (grand)son saying they won't visit until they get the shot won't do it, I'm not sure what will. :(
posted by Rhaomi at 2:32 AM on February 13 [5 favorites]


Had my second vaccine two weeks ago, and I’m expected back in the office this week. I was near the top of the list due to my workplace, but I had been worried about possibly bringing COVID home to my partner once I went back to the office. But he was able to get his first vaccine about 12 hours ago, so that’s good.

I had some rather uncomfortable injection-site pain for a couple of days after the first one, and felt kind of crappy for a few hours the next day, but the second one was a breeze. I’m looking forward to being able to use my Costco membership in 6 weeks, after Mr. Yenta is fully inoculated. I definitely did not get my money’s worth out of my membership this year.
posted by MexicanYenta at 2:49 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


We have been very, very fortunate with vaccines. My wife works for a hospital and got her second dose a week ago.

I work remotely for a different hospital in another state. So for both doses I drove 8 hours, stayed in a hotel, got my shot early in the morning, then drove 8 hours straight back so my wife isn't stuck alone with the kids any longer than necessary. So that's around 32 hours on the road total. Thank god for podcasts, audiobooks, and energy drinks.

I'm not sure I should have been a high priority for doses and I'm not sure driving so much during a pandemic was wise. But we need to get shots in arms and I'm not sure passing on my doses would have solved the structural issues that have made the rollout slow and unequal. We live in Missouri which is fighting for last place in the vaccine rollout so it was either do this drive or wait an unknown number of months.

Our extended family has been very fortunate too: out of 13 people (parents, MIL, siblings and sibling-in-laws) 8 have gotten doses thanks to being old, clinicians, or teachers.

Like I said: very, very fortunate.
posted by Tehhund at 2:57 AM on February 13 [6 favorites]


The South African Covid varient has meant that from expecting our country to only start getting vaccines some distant and unimaginable date in the future, probably next year, we're possibly getting them really soon. I feel hopeful. Thanks for starting this thread. Even if it's still going to be a long time before I personally might get vaccinated, I love knowing that other people are. So amazing.
posted by Zumbador at 4:27 AM on February 13 [6 favorites]


Another healthcare worker here, got my second dose a few weeks ago (moderna); basically everyone I work with had to take the next day off, and I was no exception. Fortunately we staggered our doses. I was really impressed with my hospital’s efficiency. When I got my first dose, there were at least 100 people in line in front of me, but I still got my shot within 15 minutes.

My 73yo dad got his first dose last night! A friend of his is a doctor and there were some unused doses at the end of the day with no arms to jab so he got called in!
posted by obfuscation at 4:41 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


I sort of had a vaccine race with my mother (this is in the UK). She got it because she’s old, I got it because my immune system is compromised. Her region was slower than mine, but in the end she got her first jab the day before I got mine, about ten days ago.
posted by Phanx at 5:12 AM on February 13 [5 favorites]


We're in North Carolina, which is distributing its vaccinations through the state Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and big hospital networks, e.g. Duke, so trying to get my 1st appointment involved leaving voicemail and filling out web forms for every vaccine provider in the county. It was frustrating. While I was waiting to hear back, my sister forwarded me a SignUpGenius link that I used to get a DHHS appointment. :|

I got the 2nd dose (Pfizer) this past Wednesday. After almost no symptoms following the 1st one, I was surprised by how sore my arm was that night and into the next day. Tylenol helped.

mrs. kingless is a teacher and her school has contacted her about getting the 1st shot later this month. Not an appointment, just a question: do you want the vaccine? She said yes, of course, so now we're waiting to see what the school does next.

Our daughter and a friend of hers moved in this past December. They aren't anywhere near being vaccinated.

Getting the shot was pleasant, at least compared to getting the 1st appointment. Stood in line, proved I was old enough multiple times, told the nurse I understood the risks, got the jab. Getting the 2nd appointment was easy since the nurse made sure I had it right after the 1st shot. Another SignUpGenius link. :|

A neighbor told me about taking his father to the same place the day before I went. He said there was no line at all! People waiting to give the vaccine but no one there to get it! My neighbor offered to get vaccinated but they turned him down. Too young.

Both nurses told me that the only thing that's changed is that 3 weeks after the 2nd dose I'll be safer. Keep wearing masks, keep avoiding other people.
posted by kingless at 5:17 AM on February 13 [1 favorite]


My mother-in-law who is 82 and in assisted living in Florida has had both her doses. My parents who are 75 and 78 and live on their own in New Hampshire have had their first dose and will get the second next week.
posted by Daily Alice at 5:23 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Got my second dose almost two weeks ago! My mom and Dad have also gotten their second doses, and my sister will be getting her second dose soon. It's all a huge relief because my sister is pregnant with her second kid and we are hoping to be able to visit and for my mom to stay and help out after the birth.

I feel really lucky to be vaccinated, but I'm still wearing my mask out and about and being choosy about where I go. I don't really feel a lot of peace of mind yet since it seems like we still don't know a lot about transmission post-vaccination and the new variants. But I feel like I'm doing my part :)
posted by Mouse Army at 5:43 AM on February 13 [3 favorites]


I had almost the same experience as obfuscation - healthcare worker, second Moderna about two weeks ago, down for the next day like everyone else I know. Felt like a weaker version of the time I got the 'flu despite vax and Tamiflu attenuation; I tried to sit up for a work Zoom and made it 45 minutes. Next day felt a ton better.

I also had the surprisingly fun experience of being a vaccinator last weekend; I keep trying to sign up again but there're wait lists! Supply is our bottleneck here, not workers. Also LMFAO's 'shots' is a much grosser song than I remember, but the chorus will still be stuck in my head when I vaccinate you.
posted by cobaltnine at 5:44 AM on February 13 [3 favorites]


My little sister got a call from an old friend: "[Hospital name]. Website. Now." and discovered that a local hospital would allow anyone to register for the patient portal, and if you were registered and in the right age bracket, you could sign up for a vaccine slot. So my parents and my uncle have all gotten their first shot and have appointments for the second! I am immensely relieved. They've been very, very careful, but they're not young and Dad's not in great health.
posted by restless_nomad (staff) at 6:08 AM on February 13 [4 favorites]


In the UK, furthest ahead globally for vaccines, my 100 year old Granny has had her first jab, and my mid 60s parents will have theirs next month or April at the latest.

I’m in France, not doing well with vaccines, and I’m the wrong kind of immunocompromised so I am looking at late summer for mine.
posted by ellieBOA at 6:20 AM on February 13 [4 favorites]


My wife gets her 2nd shot on Tuesday.
posted by COD at 6:29 AM on February 13 [3 favorites]


My 92 year old grandpa got the vaccine this past Thursday. He called for an appointment and the scheduler (from his home clinic so she knew him well) asked if he’d like her to call one of his sons so they could drive him. He said no, don’t trouble yourself, he’d drive. She very sweetly ignored this and called my parents to let them know of the appointment time and location and that she was pretty sure Grandpa would struggle to find the vaccine clinic, and so my dad was able to give my grandpa a ride to his vaccination. He’s forgetful and gets lost easily, so we are really glad the scheduler went ahead and contacted us, and I am so relieved my grandpa is vaccinated.

Also all the teachers at my toddler’s daycare got vaccinated, which is lovely. I have some close friends in healthcare who got their shots too. Each time I hear of a new one I get misty with happiness.
posted by castlebravo at 6:41 AM on February 13 [6 favorites]


My older brother helped my mom down in Kentucky get hers scheduled for first week of March, for which which I was very grateful.

Comrade Doll's mom over in Romania got a text message letting her know when her shot will be but poor thing does not know how to check her text messages. We're getting a neighbor to look at her phone and let us all know.
posted by DirtyOldTown at 7:02 AM on February 13 [1 favorite]


We're all in DC: My late-30s boyfriend has been fully vaccinated for almost a month now thanks to a quirk of where he works. My 67 year old mother is getting her second dose next week. My late-30s, no pre-existing conditions, work from home self is surely way down the priority list, but we're doing a decent job of getting shots into arms quickly here so maybe April sometime? It's a little bit strange being the non-vaccinated half of a mixed status couple, but I'm obviously thrilled that he was able to get vaccinated so quickly.
posted by fancypants at 7:07 AM on February 13 [4 favorites]


I work at a hospital that vaccinated their whole staff so I got my second shot yesterday. Today I am achy and feel like I have a low-grade fever but it's totally worth it. I feel a bit like a fraud, I've been working from home since March and will continue to do so for a long time. Meanwhile my mom (88) won't get her first shot until next week some time.

The whole process of getting vaccinated (for me) was smooth and exciting. The staff were super friendly and there's this feeling of hope throughout the whole thing. Cases are trending downward, more and more friends are getting shots... there's a light. The past few years have been so bad though that I'm trying not to get my hopes up too high.

I was saddened to see a good friend post some anti-vax stuff on Facebook. "We don't know what the long term effects are!" 1) We pretty much do and 2) it's sure better than the long term effects of COVID.
posted by bondcliff at 7:11 AM on February 13 [8 favorites]


I'm a physician in the US, got my first dose just before Christmas and my second about a month ago. Extreme fatigue with dose 1 (I got the shot mid-afternoon and was fast asleep by 7pm); with dose 2 I felt physically ok but cognitively foggy (gave up working on a manuscript and went for a walk around the block that afternoon, which helped) -- and then that night, I woke up with shaking chills and could not even get myself out of bed to get another blanket. That was, um, not fun.

The next morning I felt like I had fallen down a flight of stairs; luckily I'd kept some ibuprofen and a water bottle on my nightstand in prep, so I took that, lay in bed for another hour, by which time I was able to at least get up and dressed and able to work.

That experience confirms my suspicion that I had a very mild case of covid in March; people who have had it certainly seem to have more intense reactions to the mRNA vaccines at least. Even after my rough experience with dose #2, I would still 1000% recommend the vaccine to anyone. I have written so many "this person has a high risk comorbidity" letters for my patients that I now just keep a stack of them like work excuse notes.

My sibling is a non-healthcare essential worker in a different state and got their second shot this past week, with minimal reaction. My 65+ year old dad got his first shot through CVS this week as well. We're trying to sort out getting my under-65-but-high-risk mom a shot; she is eligible under her county's guidelines but the rollout there has been such a cluster, it was actually featured on national news as an example of how confusing the process has been. Example: the county created a vaccine dashboard to cut down on calls, but the "check your status" link kept incorrectly telling people their zipcode wasn't eligible, then their age wasn't eligible, and it still doesn't reflect the comorbidity or job status eligibility criteria. My mom was a programmer for 35 years; I think she's madder about the dashboard than anything.
posted by basalganglia at 7:35 AM on February 13 [7 favorites]


My dad (67) got jabbed today! He got the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine. They've set up a vaccination centre at the racecourse. He said it was super efficient and loads of people were volunteering and everyone was very friendly and helpful. In and out straight away, no hanging around. He says once his 3 weeks post-vax isolation is over he's going to volunteer himself!

My grandma (83, COPD-haver) had her first dose weeks back. I mean considering how badly the UK has handled the rest of this mess, at least we seem (knock wood) to be doing good getting people vaccinated.
posted by Balthamos at 8:39 AM on February 13 [4 favorites]


In Canada, our vaccine supply has been... troubled. The only person I know so far who's gotten it is my very good friend, a hospital health care worker who would be providing care to covid patients. Thankfully she got hers way back in December, and that alone is a huge relief that she can protect herself and her family.

My parents (mid-70s) are slated to get theirs in April, and myself in late summer -- assuming Canada can get its doses. We'll see.
posted by cgg at 8:45 AM on February 13 [5 favorites]


Both my mom and my partner are healthcare workers, and a friend works in close-contact with first responders, all got the Moderna. Mom's and friend's first doses went fine. Mom's second dose was kinda bleh, friend's second dose was pretty rough. Partner's first dose was TERRIBLE and we were a little concerned there was an allergic reaction involved (but never got to the point of definitely needing a hospital visit), but their second dose was just a day and a half of feeling pretty tired and a sore arm.

Working theory is that it's your second exposure that's the problem. Partner is pretty sure they had COVID back in May, which would make their first dose the "heavy reaction" dose, versus most folks who have an issue with the second dose. (and I see a few responses upthread with similar stories)

Everyone's doing well now!
posted by curious nu at 8:49 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Just spoke to my mum, she and my dad are getting the first vaccine in 10 days! The UK has a 3 month gap between doses 1 and 2.
posted by ellieBOA at 8:57 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Got my first on Tuesday, but my wife still cant find out when she can get one. Mine was through work. After so many schedule/cancel cycles from expected deliveries not showing up, it pretty much came down to luck/who can keep the calendar empty for when the "Ok, now! While supplies last, who can go?" email.

At least we did the "first come, first served" portion (within the priority category) over email instead of just showing up in an unruly mob and making the poor medics deal with it. They actually sent our coordinators a thank-you letter for that, I guess not all groups are even that minimally organized.
posted by ctmf at 9:03 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


No noticeable effect from the first other than a moderately sore arm. The sore arm was worse than my average for vaccines, but not the worst I've ever had.
posted by ctmf at 9:04 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Here in Oregon, all speech-language pathologists are considered part of 1a and therefore have been eligible for about a month now - which I only found out thanks to a text from a former supervisor one Friday back in January. It was the first I'd heard of it, and while I meant to jump on the clinic she'd clued me in on, that clinic was about an hour away, I kept trying to get "one more thing" done for work, and before I knew it I'd missed out. BUT, I dug up the official info confirming that SLPs were eligible and sent it along to my little SLP cohort at my current job site - none of them had heard about it, either.

Fast forward to the following Sunday around 6am - I got up to go to the bathroom and was reading my phone on the can when I saw a group text from one of my coworkers, letting us all know that there were still sign-up slots at a local drive-in clinic (I still don't know how she found out, as I was signed up for updates but official communication has been poor, and I'd already unofficially heard that that clinic was full). All 5 of us signed up for that morning and spent the time texting pics back and forth of ourselves in the car line, getting the shot, then checking in on each other throughout the rest of the day. It became a wonderful impromptu group bonding thing, and while vaccine access really shouldn't depend on random tip-offs from people you know, I feel really fortunate to have been part of a network that made it possible.

Also, while it was a typically grey and rainy day, the clinic itself felt so festive! You could see others in their cars taking selfies; all of the workers who helped me were so upbeat and really seemed to feel what a big deal this was for all of us; and the person who administered my jab shared "stupid jokes" with me the whole time. My only side effect for dose 1 was an arm that was somewhat more sore than a typical flu shot, and I'm eager to get dose 2 in about two more weeks.
posted by DingoMutt at 9:07 AM on February 13 [6 favorites]


(also, my mom and her boyfriend have an appointment to get theirs on Monday!! They are in Florida, and I am unspeakably relieved that they're actually going to be starting the vaccination process soon)
posted by DingoMutt at 9:09 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Got my first dose this week, courtesy of my employer, who has a lot of first responders on staff (although I am not a first responder by any means). It went very smoothly and I felt fine that day, although the next day I was a bit sore and quite tired: a 20-minute nap turned into 2 hours.
posted by suelac at 10:07 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


My sister is a health care worker and is fully vaccinated. My parents have both received their first dose. I, though I have been teaching in-person classes in higher education this whole year, am not even on a list yet because Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds is a dumpster fire.
posted by vegartanipla at 10:10 AM on February 13 [7 favorites]


Got my second dose of Pfizer day before yesterday. No worse that a flu shot. I’m so excited! I’ve been really anxious about Covid, but really trust the vaccine. My 80-something parents have had their first dose and are scheduled for their second. My husband is signed up, but no idea when he will be able to get his. Still, with the other three of us protected we should be able to socialize together, especially as the weather begins to warm and we can get outside.

I’ve known I was under a cloud for a long time, but as so often happens I didn’t realize just how heavy it was until it began to lift. Between the new administration, vaccination, and spring right around the corner, I’m practically giddy!

Best wishes to everyone that you will get your dose soon!!
posted by probably not that Karen Blair at 10:12 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Hospital people got vaccinated here starting in December so my dog-walking friend has gotten her first and second shots. My sister works for a state agency that vaccinated everyone so she got her second shot last week (ran a fever for a while but was otherwise ok). My 97 year old landlady was all set to get vaccinated at the hospital a few weeks ago but it was right when vaccination changed from being done/registered/etc by hospitals to being done at a state level so everyone's appointments got cancelled (so much grousing! I don't blame people.) and then they had to swim upstream through the stupid portal to make appointments. And then... also on the day of the registration portal opening it turns out that one of the local drug stores was also letting people register?

It took all the fortitude I had to be like "I am your computer helper but I am working all day today and there are a number of people who could help you do this, so please ask one of them to help you get registered" It's been really difficult to try to manage COVID-era boundaries with a very elderly and frail person who both doesn't want "professional" help (through a combination of frugality and independence) but also needs assistance for some of these things. I believe she has an appointment for this week and I am hoping I don't get some last minute phone call asking for a ride there.

Vermont is doing well with vaccination, it should be doing better. I am way down the list so am mostly just hunkering at home but it's good to know that the people around me are, day by day, getting safer.
posted by jessamyn (retired) at 10:23 AM on February 13 [5 favorites]


It's a shame that so many people are having trouble with the online scheduling portals for their vaccines. Scheduling through my employer's portal was a breeze. It probably helps that it's an established piece of software that has been able to schedule stuff like this for years so they didn't have to throw together an entirely new feature on a tight timeline.
posted by Tehhund at 10:40 AM on February 13 [1 favorite]


I got my dad his appointment this week. I've only told a couple of people, because a few friends have lost parents to this very recently and I don't want to brag or rub it in, but I'm SO happy, I am so happy, I am so happy. My mom already got hers from work, but my dad's not working right now, which means in a couple weeks he'll be able to go up and pod with my sister to help take care of her baby and pack for her cross-country move so she won't be alone, and my extremely anxious mom can worry a little less. It's a weirdly primal feeling of pride and satisfaction, like hauling a rabbit back to the cave in winter, I HAVE SECURED RESOURCES FOR THE BETTERMENT OF THE IN-GROUP, YES GOOD.

It was like you hear about, just chaos, me and my sister staying up late and getting up early and eventually just frantically punching in every city we could think of to find a CVS that might have a slot, there was conflicting information on the news whether there even were appointments. Finally I remembered a city two and a half hours from my parents' house where I used to stop for gas driving home from grad school, and that had a slot for this weekend.

And I am really truly elated and grateful, but I hate that it's like this, I hate what this is like for people who don't have friends or relatives in a position to help, and if I'm being honest, I don't have kids and these are the moments when I worry if there'll be anyone to do this for me come the day. But I can't control that; volunteer vaccine helpers are getting organized in my city so for now that's what I can do, and I guess just try and stay healthy till it's my turn.
posted by jameaterblues at 11:04 AM on February 13 [8 favorites]


My oldest boy and his fiancee, both essential workers, got their Pfizer vaccine. They had some soreness after the first shot and more after the second, but no serious side effects. My wife and I are on a stand-by list for people who can get to one of the vaccination sites quickly if there are no-shows.

I wish I could convince my parents to get their shots, but they are procrastinating. Distribution isn't great where they live, but they aren't making any effort as far as I can tell.
posted by maurice at 11:16 AM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Poland, hospital doc.

Vaccinated with Pfizer vaccine December 30th, got my second dose the day of Joe Biden's inauguration (that's how I remembered anyhow)

It was a good day.

Unfortunately the
posted by M. at 11:32 AM on February 13 [3 favorites]


My wife lucked into her first dose three weeks ago because extra unused doses at the university hospital where she works were going to be discarded. Yesterday, she got her second dose. She had some arm pain through the night and says she's still feeling kind of crappy today, but that's it for adverse effects.

I'm apparently eligible for group 1B, even though I'm under 65, due to preexisting conditions. Virginia is finally rolling out a statewide appointment scheduling system on Tuesday, so I'm looking forward to signing up when I can.
posted by emelenjr at 12:08 PM on February 13 [2 favorites]


my husband is scheduled for his first shot on tuesday. I will probably be one of the last to go but I'm ok with that, I want front line workers and the at-risk to get protected.

my parents are trying to get theirs but apparently the situation in NJ is pretty challenging right now. hopefully they'll be able to get it soon, esp dad who is over 75 and recent cancer survivor. (go dad!)
posted by supermedusa at 12:09 PM on February 13 [2 favorites]


my sister (a nurse) got her second Moderna recently and had a few pretty rough days with fever and aches but she is feeling better now.
posted by supermedusa at 12:11 PM on February 13 [2 favorites]


I got my first Moderna last month and I’m going to get the second on Tuesday. I had a sore arm from the first, but nothing worse than what I get with the flu vaccine. My mother, who’s 78, got her second dose of the Pfizer this week, and reported no side effects other than feeling a little tired and sore the day after.
posted by holborne at 12:22 PM on February 13 [2 favorites]


I got my first dose of the Oxford/AstraZeneca at midday yesterday. The invitation from my GP came as a big surprise since I am under 50 (only just) and I have no serious health conditions. I think my confusion was common because the first thing the nurse giving me the jab asked was "Do you know why you are here"?

So the current strategy is something like this. 65+ people are getting their vaccinations at the mass vaccine centres (cohort 5). People (18-65) with underlying health conditions and carers (cohort 6) are getting their vaccines through their GPs. However, the search criteria run by the NHS is fairly broad so it can pick up things like childhood glandular fever. Mine criteria is probably the small amount of steroids I use for a minor skin condition (that is just a guess). The view of the medical staff is that since everyone is going to be vaccinated anyway (hopefully) a few out of order is not going to make much difference in the grand scheme of things.

Anyway, 600 hundred people were being vaccinated that day at the local medical centre and the entire thing was run like a military operation. People had to queue outside for twenty minutes on a freezing, windy day. Everyone was taking it in good humour though and it all ran like clockwork.

Today my upper arm aches, I have an off and on mild headache, I'm feeling a bit under-the-weather and I am cold all the time. So, not too bad really.
posted by antiwiggle at 12:33 PM on February 13 [4 favorites]


I'm in the "good luck, maybe late in the year if supplies hold up but don't hold your breath" low-priority category. But my highest-risk family members have all gotten their first shots, and I am hopeful that my partner can get hers within a month or so.

I really hate that access still seems to be dependent on word of mouth in many places, as well as favoring people with excellent computer skills rather than more equitable approaches.
posted by Dip Flash at 12:34 PM on February 13 [1 favorite]

I, though I have been teaching in-person classes in higher education this whole year, am not even on a list yet because Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds is a dumpster fire.
She really is. I'm not in any priority category, and Iowa is a disaster, so I'm not expecting it anytime soon. But my father, who lives in a part of the US with a reasonably-functional government, is getting his second dose tomorrow, which is a huge, huge relief.
posted by ArbitraryAndCapricious at 12:49 PM on February 13 [5 favorites]


I was in one of the first batches to get my first and second. I got the Pfizer vaccine.

My reaction to the first vaccine was weird. You know how when you get the flu shot, you basically get a mild case of the flu? (At least I do). My first dose, I could feel my body gearing up like "okay, time to make him warm, time to make his nose run and his throat scratchy". Like, it felt like I was getting sick but there was no getting sick part. It was just the physical defenses, if that makes sense. I went to bed a little early for a couple days and was kind of draggy, but, like, not as foggy headed and gross feeling as I am while sick.

Everyone warned me the second dose was the rough one for that particular vaccine but honestly? I got nothing. I felt bad because people tried so hard to prep me and I even let my boss know I might be a little draggy. My arm was a little sore and I went to bed early that night but after that, nothing.

It was weird because usually the flu shot hits me like a ton of bricks (but having had The Real Flu, not a pretentious cold, I'll take the shot) but this was fairly mild.

feels good man.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 1:12 PM on February 13 [2 favorites]


I have been trying to get my 90 y.o. mom on the list, but she's in Wilmington, NC and they have an extremely limited supply; so much so, that they aren't even taking names on a wait list. I was able to sign up for a notification email that will be sent out once the next shipment arrives and appointments can be scheduled.

I am an essential worker, and we aren't eligible at this time. They have just opened up the scheduling to teachers and school staff, so that's even more people trying to get on the list.
posted by mightshould at 1:31 PM on February 13 [1 favorite]


My uncle in Tennessee who's in his eighties and works in management of care homes got the vaccine. He had no reaction, which worried him because he'd read that if you don't feel side effects that the vaccine might not be as effective. So he actually called the CDC. Which confused the hell out of them, by all accounts. "You say you had no adverse side effects. You had no side effects at all. Sir, what exactly is the problem?"
Supposedly my colleagues at our New Orleans office got vaccinated but no word if or when San Francisco's turn will be.
posted by The Ardship of Cambry at 1:31 PM on February 13 [6 favorites]


Just a note that I have a fairly extreme phobia of injections, and reading so many people exclaiming positively about vaccines is a really nice thing. Hopefully by the time my non-priority millennial ass gets to the front of the queue I'll be so stoked to be vaccinated that I won't be so terrified of the jab itself.
posted by Balthamos at 1:35 PM on February 13 [14 favorites]


I will say the shot itself was hands down the least painful I’ve ever experienced, so that was nice! Literally you could give it to me in my sleep without waking me.
posted by obfuscation at 1:53 PM on February 13 [5 favorites]


I was saddened to see a good friend post some anti-vax stuff on Facebook. "We don't know what the long term effects are!" 1) We pretty much do and 2) it's sure better than the long term effects of COVID.

Likewise and likewise. I had to cut loose someone I have known for decades as she had become a strident proponent of uncovering Bill Gates' secret plan to monitor us all and urging people to refuse the "untested globalist communist vaccine."

I am not yet vaccinated myself but was happy to find I can proceed without much trepidation; I take a twice-yearly infusion of a medication that has so far stopped my MS in its tracks but I had read it did not cooperate well with the vaccines currently available. I had a phone appointment with my neurologist this week and was assured that I should be fine as long as I get the vaccine a month or two before the infusion. Yay! I hope in four months' time or so to get a jab!
posted by ricochet biscuit at 2:05 PM on February 13 [2 favorites]


My dad (80+) got his second dose of Pfizer yesterday. I texted to him last night to ask how he was feeling, and he said that he had a really long nap and felt great. My sister texted him this morning to check on him and he said he was doing fine. I texted him this afternoon to check on him and he responded but did not tell me how he felt; I suspect that he's tired of people asking him how he's feeling.
posted by amarynth at 2:06 PM on February 13 [4 favorites]


My 86 year old dad has had both jabs and actually had the second one at the three week mark rather than having to wait twelve weeks. He had a slight headache and a sore arm and that was it. I am scheduled to have my first vaccination on Monday morning and am very pleased about it.
posted by Martha My Dear Prudence at 2:15 PM on February 13 [4 favorites]


I got mine as part of the first group here because of some work I've been doing. I got called to book an appointment on Christmas day. The first shot made my arm hurt. The second one didn't make it hurt much, until several days after, when I felt very tired, and had several naps while my arm was hurting. All better after some sleep. My wife says she would get the shots even if she knew she would get an anaphylactic reaction, because, hey, we can usually treat that well with quick attention. We know COVID is treatable, but still.... She's set to do higher risk work but hasn't been called to book shots yet. It doesn't always seem to make sense. Even among the science-educated folks, anecdotes about adverse effects, and expressions of personal intent to get vaccinated seem to influence people's decision-making. My wife posted my "I got vaccinated sticker" on the internet, and that drew some attention. Most people getting the fatigue response seem to get it within a day or so of the second shot, from what I've heard locally. I really don't know enough immunology to interpret my delayed response. Anyway, Yay! I'm Vaccinated!
posted by sillyman at 2:45 PM on February 13 [1 favorite]


I assisted my 90-year-old neighbor in securing an appointment online. She’s amazingly tough and hasn’t had any adverse effects for either dose. My parents, in a small town in a different state, will get their second doses Monday.

A relevant piggyback question, if I may: I could’ve sworn I saw a very optimistic vaccine op-ed/article/blog post yesterday in an American newspaper or website. It referenced Dr. Fauci’s “open season by April” comment, speculated that those administering the Moderna vaccine would be formally allowed to use additional doses in each vial (which approval I think was actually granted sometime yesterday), mentioned the high likelihood of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine being available soon, etc. It was a shockingly, pleasantly optimistic view of the vaccine picture in the coming months, and suggested that soon enough here in the US a bigger problem will be vaccine reticence and not adequate supply. This would’ve been published Friday 2/12/21. Not the David Brooks op-ed in the NYT. Does anyone know where I could find this? I’d like to share it with a depressed and gloomy relative. (With whom I’ll also be sharing this thread!)
posted by cheapskatebay at 2:52 PM on February 13 [3 favorites]


I got my first dose (Pfizer) last night. The county is running its own appointment system through Eventbrite. The first few rounds were EXTREMELY oversubscribed, and a team of local friends has been working hard to snag appointments for eligible seniors connected to our friend group. But this most recent round of appointments was different; instead of selling out in a few minutes, it took nearly the entire day to run out. Sure enough, last night by the end of the evening the list had been run through and enough no-shows had occurred that there were dozens of extra shots that would expire that night. I got a call from a friend who's part of the distribution effort saying I basically had fifteen minutes to get to the site and get a jab or it was getting trashed, and sure enough I managed to get a shot. It was totally wild, I still can't believe it happened. More importantly though I also managed to get one for my 61 year old mom. She's gonna get to hug her grandkids again for the first time in a year. I'm fucking ecstatic. I hope if you haven't already that you all get to feel this joy very, very soon.
posted by saladin at 3:03 PM on February 13 [6 favorites]


My best friend is fully vaccinated. My parents have had dose #1, as has another friend. My immediate family and in-laws are still waiting our turn. No idea at all when that will be!
posted by eirias at 3:20 PM on February 13 [2 favorites]


Re: the jab, itself. I literally felt nothing. The technician explained it’s a very fine needle injecting a very small amount of stuff so it’s over in a flash. Hope this encourages some people.
posted by probably not that Karen Blair at 3:35 PM on February 13 [4 favorites]


Had my second shot late January (Moderna). I told my coworker I really would have liked to have called out the following day, but it was insisted that I would show up for work.

Loooool. I was so so so so so sick. And I don’t get sick. Except that I guess now that means I more than likely had Covid in May/June. The first dose I just had my May/June headache and stomach upset and vertigo. The second dose I went to bed and woke up at 0230 the next morning feeling like death eating a cracker. I was freezing with a heck of a fever and I kind of dozed in and out until it was time to go to work. I dragged myself to the station and got in the bed (much to the chagrin of the others on shift). They made me get up at noon to sit in the watchroom with the phones so they could go out and do errands. Headache, vertigo, stomach upset, chills, fever, fatigue. I stayed up until about 2130 and went to sleep after a long shower where I just couldn’t get warm enough. Got in the bed under as many blankets as I had in my locker and around 0430 the next morning I woke up, soaked. And I was like “geez I’m glad that’s over.” I was still very tired for the next few days.

I never thought I was sick in May/June BECAUSE I DIDN'T HAVE A FEVER. I just thought I was “worn out.”

My partnerthing had NO SIDE EFFECTS. I have no idea how I didn’t get him sick tbh, but we don’t live together so who knows.

Anyway. Most of my older family (70+) have been vaccinated, and my cousin's wife - a pharmacist IN a hospital - has been vaccinated. No one else has seemed to have the same reactions I did...except for a lot of the people I work with in emergency services 🙃. Makes me wonder how widespread it is/was in our lines of work.

I’m in SENC but my family is in Charlotte.
posted by sara is disenchanted at 3:35 PM on February 13 [4 favorites]


Seconding others re: the jab itself. It was nothing. I didn't even realize it had happened. My arm is a little stiff and sore today, but otherwise if you'd told me that they actually never gave me a shot I'd have believed you.

My wife had her second (Moderna) shot last week and it absolutely wrecked her. One full day of 103 fever and misery. Which, as others have said, probably confirms that she had Covid very early on (we all had a weird cough for like 4 days in April, despite having been completely locked down, so who knows). But absolutely worth every second of discomfort.
posted by saladin at 3:46 PM on February 13 [3 favorites]


Except that I guess now that means I more than likely had Covid in May/June.

Hm, not sure about that. People I know who had confirmed Covid had severe responses to their first shot but not so much the second. I know sooo many people who had no response on the first shot and got very sick with their second, and there’s no way we all had it (I mean, we’re healthcare workers but still...). I definitely had no symptomatic illness of any sort in 2020.
posted by obfuscation at 3:50 PM on February 13 [1 favorite]


I don’t know for sure, and I didn’t get tested for antibodies. I know after I got sick, a bunch of other people at work tested positive in July. I just want to know how I was sick at all and whatever it was that I had because it was awful. Do Not Want. No no no.

[ETA: the medics and other firemen I know who had tested positive went down with their second shot.]

The weird thing was the headache. I have migraine and vertigo. But the headache I had in the spring and then again with the vaccine...nothing worked. Ibuprofen - no, naproxen - no, imitrex - no, acetaminophen - no, drink more water - no, add salt to food - no, cut sodium back - no, sleep - no. A headache I’ve never otherwise experienced, and it lasted for over 3 weeks. No aura, no icepick, no thunderclap, no stroke, no TIA, my BP is usually a systolic of 116 or so, so no hypertension. I’m weird about my food/drink triggers for migraine, so I made sure nothing changed with my diet in that regard.

(I have my annual physical next month, so yes it’s going to be addressed.)

Sorry for the derail.
posted by sara is disenchanted at 4:03 PM on February 13


My sister and her husband and her daughter have all gotten shots. They're in Mass which seems to have its act together better than Pennsylvania. I'm technically in Phase 1A because of my >30 BMI but the distribution is such a shit-show here that I can't find anyone with shots available who will take non-patients.
posted by octothorpe at 4:08 PM on February 13 [3 favorites]


My wife's a contact tracer, which means she got both shots last month.

I'm not an essential worker, but have one comorbidity (asthma) and am a university person, so... got one vaccination scheduled, then canceled, and another appointment tomorrow. Here's hoping.

My father's about 90 and riddled with comorbidities. He's in a rehab facility and has no idea when he'll get one.

My kids are young, nonessential (in this scheme), lacking comorbidities, and so have no idea.
posted by doctornemo at 4:26 PM on February 13 [3 favorites]


I was able to schedule my husband’s (68) first shot about 10 days ago. The site opened at 10 AM, but wasn’t working until 10:06. His confirmation came through at 10:14, at 10:15 all 2000 appointments had been filled. He goes on the 23rd for his second jab of the Moderna vaccine. Since then, our county in WA has gotten NO doses for first injection.
I’m currently undergoing proton radiotherapy (radiation) and am staying in a hotel long-term for this, as it’s a long ways from home. They are really nice and let me store my frozen food in their walk-in freezer. I have housekeeping come on the weekends, when I’m home (I leave on Friday afternoon, and come back Sunday evening).
The center where I get my therapy has some really great employees. One of them sent me (I’m 67) some direct links to their two sites for vaccine registration. I kept trying, but no dice. Then last Monday evening I got a call from a woman at the center. She said this fellow had given her my name as someone who wanted a vaccination. She was able to schedule me over the phone for a shot on Friday, after my therapy. So yesterday I got my first shot (Pfizer) - yay!! They scheduled me for my next shot on the last day of my therapy - so no special trip needed for it. I’m so very happy. I still won’t be going anywhere except medical appointments - at least until mid-summer, when I’m done with my oral chemotherapy; but I’ll feel all the safer for doing it. This was truly outstanding customer service on the part of the radiation center.
posted by dbmcd at 5:42 PM on February 13 [9 favorites]


I'm eligible due to work and got my first dose (Moderna) yesterday. I have never been so excited to get a healthcare procedure in my life. Jubilant!

As a data point, I have a pretty sore arm and fatigue remarkably similar to when my inflammatory arthritis flares. No biggie and I can already feel it easing up.

The healthcare facility I work in has a chapel like many, and they chose that area as the place to monitor for any post injection reactions. As a lapsed Catholic, coming to sit in a pew in the quiet felt remarkably like I had just received Communion and was now in quiet contemplation for 15 min until the monitor standing at a lectern made his benediction by calling my name to let me leave.

If you're wondering, I did in fact contemplate quite a lot about how fortunate and privileged I felt and how I wished everyone would have (and take) this chance soon. And I felt the most hopeful I have felt in a while.
posted by Tandem Affinity at 6:05 PM on February 13 [7 favorites]


I have an aunt who lives in a group home in the north shore and she has been vaccinated. She's had a hard time with the isolation and not working - she's been working at McDonalds since my grandparents moved to Massachusetts in 1989, so it's been a really important source of stability and routine for her - so she's hoping to be able to go back to work again soon.

Otherwise, vaccine distribution is a really mess here. Right now, if you accompany someone 75+ to get a vaccine, you can also get one so there is basically a black market in finding elderly people who need a ride. I have literally no idea when I'll be vaccinated, but I love seeing family and friends getting their shots.
posted by ChuraChura at 6:22 PM on February 13 [3 favorites]


I had my first Moderna shot on board for three weeks, when I was exposed to covid, and I got tested today. The adults in my family here have it, and are abed, but it is not too bad and improvement comes and goes. I get my second shot Monday morning. I will know in 2-7 days if I have covid, I don't feel my best, and I am not sure. When I was told I was exposed a week and a half ago, I re-isolated totally, except for two trips out for fast food. Anyway, I was supposed to go to my Step Mom's burial in Utah this weekend, but I canceled because of my exposure and iffy feelingness. Then, it turns out, one of the step sisters had covid and came around on the day of my Step Mom's death, so there was exposure, for several people. Then my brother who has only barely lived to tell the tale of last year, and now walks on two prosthethic legs, is kind of a covid denier, and he was telling me stuff like, "We hugged, but we held our breath." You know, if my head were going to explode in this life time, it would have been upon hearing that statement. I am ever so glad to have been innoculated, because I might end up helping others with this illness. I have made sure to help a friend I help, to get her shot and next appointment. They make it really difficult for the elderly to book appointments.
posted by Oyéah at 6:40 PM on February 13 [7 favorites]


I got both of my parents appointments for a week from now through the new Washington COVID Vaccine Finder website. They have to drive a ways to get it, but they're super excited! It's been very difficult getting appointments in King County so that website was a godsend.
posted by mollywas at 7:01 PM on February 13 [4 favorites]


Over 10% of the people in my county have received their first dose.
posted by aniola at 7:50 PM on February 13 [4 favorites]


I see a bunch of my friends in K-12 and those that are older have gotten theirs. I'm so happy for them.


Just checked my county's website. 1B is open My dad (81) is eligible and has preregistered with UH. I don't have the time to be stalking a bunch of websites to try to get him an appointment. I wish I could. I've just run out of spoons.
I won't see a vaccine anytime soon since ECEs aren't considered essential workers. Ohio is also a dumpster fire. In fact, ECEs might not be part of 1C *with other essential workers*. So yeah, I expect to get mine sometime next year.

posted by kathrynm at 10:12 PM on February 13


no! parents, 83/77, the former with dementia the latter the former's primary caregiver, cannot get an appointment in maryland, with themselves, myself and their grandchild's mother trying every day. as little lurk just started in-person school, they cannot see their grandchild. i am furious and frozen in impotent rage. in fairness, they supposedly could get appointments for doses at six-flags some distance away, and i keep offering to drive them there (at some risk to them), but they balk, even when i promise to take them on the rides after, and i do not push too hard, having just taken away mom's one hopeful moment of relief from the neverending burden of caring for pop, weekly visits from little lurk. vaccine deployment in this state is being handled just the way the federal government's deployment of ppe and tests went nationwide this spring, except that there are 2 million eligible people competing each with every instead of 50 states. i though governor hogan was not terrible, even guardedly admiring him at times, until recent weeks; now i hate him with unmitigated fury.
posted by 20 year lurk at 10:19 PM on February 13 [3 favorites]


My sister, who works in a clinic, got her 2nd Pfizer dose today. For her first, she posted a selfie with "Circle, circle, dot dot now I have my cootie shot." Today it was "Circle, circle, square, square, now I have it everywhere!"

My dad got his first Pfizer dose last week. When he posted about it I was happy but confused: How did he manage to qualify? Which is how I remembered that he's over 65, which is a thing that is just never going to feel real to me. My dad's gonna be like 45 forever.
posted by rhiannonstone at 10:50 PM on February 13 [8 favorites]


It takes a village! My BF’s BIL got an appointment for BF’s mom (77) at the Javits. Because Cuomo is such a fucking disaster in rollout, we had all been stressed about getting her a time slot for weeks. So this past Tuesday my BF and I drove her into the city for a late-afternoon appointment. We were an hour early but nobody seemed to care about that and the Javits was practically empty. I was on escort duty, and BF drove around the block. MIL wanted a wheelchair because of all the walking involved, and we got her right into the vaccine-administering section. In the arm—boom. She complimented the nurse for how well the shot was given. Everybody was so pleasant and helpful. In and out in 40 minutes. It was the Pfizer one. Her second shot is in early March—just show up on the day and she will be taken care of.

Thank. God.
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 4:25 AM on February 14 [2 favorites]


It warms my heart to see all these stories of vaccine success. Celebrating with all of you.

Oh! A place to share this! I am so relieved, my 70+ year old parents (with comorbidities) will be getting their first vaccine doses this week! In Iowa!

My mom had been calling the community health clinic, the pharmacies, and everywhere else that was listed as a contact point. She even tried online, which is challenging for her. She got put on hold for hours at a time, and after two weeks of devoting 4+ hours a day to getting her and Dad a COVID vaccine: she did it! Yay Mom!

Their town is rife with secret early registering and the general dumpster fire that is Kim Reynolds.

I'm trying to remain optimistic. I'm so worried that the rug is going to be pulled out from underneath them, and they'll end up indefinitely rescheduled.
posted by Guess What at 5:00 AM on February 14 [4 favorites]


My mom had her first dose a couple weeks ago and her second dose is scheduled for the end of this month (Ohio). My sister, her husband, their son and his wife and in-laws all got their second shots last week. My nephew works in a surgery center in Florida and they had so many excess doses that management decided to let family members come in, so I guess that's good in that every person who gets fully vaccinated is a net good but FUCK this is just such a clusterfuck all around. Eldest brother got his second dose week before last. Two of our siblings have decided they aren't getting the vaccine and keep trying to talk the rest of us out of getting ours. So that's fun.

My teacher friends (Ohio) all got their first shots last week and continuing into next week. Really really happy for all of them and they should have had theirs first, but oh well.

I was initially going to be in phase 1C starting 2/15 but they changed it from "severe asthma" to "severe asthma requiring hospitalization in the last year" so now I wait again. It's hard not to get discouraged but I am very glad for every completed vaccination.
posted by cooker girl at 7:09 AM on February 14 [1 favorite]


I (65+) got my first jab (Moderna) last week at the county health center by camping out on their website to grab a slot as soon as it opened, which turned out to be only once a week on Saturday morning. This is in SE Wisconsin.

My experience was positive, in that there were lots of super-polite staff directing people, and tons of space with clear floor markers, so despite the crowds it was never crowded. There was one pause of about a minute waiting for a needle booth to open up, but otherwise no waiting. Counting the 15-minute wait to make sure there was no allergic reaction, I was in and out in about 30 minutes.

Walgreen's and CVS are both listed as "authorized" to give the vaccine in my area, however their website sign-up pages don't even list the coronavirus vaccine as an option yet. Hence my 30-minute drive to the county facility versus something closer. No complaints, though, in these early days!

Next up, getting my partner (63) vaccinated. Until then, I'm allowing myself to daydream about things like going to the gym and the dentist, and getting a professional haircut. And of course the second jab.
posted by Short Attention Sp at 7:14 AM on February 14 [4 favorites]


Hong Kong is starting soon! I can't wait. They'll HAVE to allow vaccinated folks to travel in/out more easily than the mandatory three-week, at-your-own-expense, quarantine on return situation we have now. I'm happy to be living somewhere where everyday folks have been really responsible.
posted by mdonley at 7:25 AM on February 14 [2 favorites]


The UK is doing pretty well at vaccination, and the vulnerable people in my life have all received their first jabs. None has an appointment for a second jab, though - I have to trust that these will be rolled out as efficiently as the first set, but I fear supply issues. The extended gap between the two jabs may prove to be a good move, but until the second jabs start in earnest, I'll be tense.
posted by altolinguistic at 8:14 AM on February 14 [2 favorites]


My husband and I have received our first shot of the Pfizer vaccine early this month. We have preexisting conditions that put us in the 1b category and we are lucky that our primary care doctors are in a major hospital system here in Dallas, Texas. For us that meant they sent us an email that we were eligible and booked our appointments through their online patient portal. We should receive our second shots next week, waiting for the next email to schedule those appointments. My husband only had minor red swollen circle at the injection site and mild discomfort, I had a stronger reaction with more arm swelling and pain that went away within 48 hours. I have heard the second shot can make you feel severe fatigue for the day after so we are trying to plan for that if we need to take a day off work.

My MIL is 78 and was able to sign up through our county health department and got her first shot in the middle of January, and was due for her second shot yesterday. Due to the inclement weather that came in late last week and will hang around all this week, she will have to wait until next week to get her second shot. The county has already announced they will prioritize people who need their second shots for the first few days after they are able to reopen the vaccination sites so she should be able to get her second shot within the two week window for the second dose.
posted by blacktshirtandjeans at 9:05 AM on February 14 [1 favorite]


My mom is an overweight, 59 year-old IV therapist at a hospital in southwest WA state. As someone who places IVs and PICCs, she takes care of patients all over the hospital, which means suiting up and being on the COVID unit every day. She got her first dose of the Pfizer vaccine several days before Christmas and her second dose a couple or three weeks later. She was extremely relieved to receive it, because she has lost a coworker and multiple coworkers have lost a family member. It's been extremely stressful. She's been working 5+ back to back 12-16 hour days.

Her biggest concern with the Pfizer mRNA vaccine is while it is unprecedentedly effective, like, quite amazing really, the side effects she experienced and was told to expect make her concerned about compliance and antivaxers in the future. She had awful headaches and chills and stuff for a couple days, and so did maybe half of her coworkers. She was in the first group receiving the vaccine, phase 1a, and she was encouraged by management and agencies to not keep the side effects to herself, so that people are not surprised. She considered the symptoms pretty minor but she is afraid of millions of hypochondriacs and/or... sensitive individuals feeling like the vaccine made them sick.

"Got a headache? You know it's working. You're fine."
posted by floam at 9:56 AM on February 14 [6 favorites]


A good friend of mine was in the Moderna trial. He was unblinded a few weeks ago (placebo group) and given the actual vaccine.

Elderly grandparents have all been vaccinated, as have some parents and some siblings, who are health care workers. We are anxious for our own turns, but it's been good to see the process moving, however slowly.
posted by jedicus at 11:42 AM on February 14 [1 favorite]


All the chit-chat at church this morning was from people who just had the shot. How easy it we, how few side effects they had — “Not even a sore arm!” —how relieved they were, etc.
They are all in their 80s. We have a very tiny and elderly church. Meanwhile I am in my early 60s and won’t be eligible, probably, until April. :-(
posted by SLC Mom at 12:01 PM on February 14 [3 favorites]


Jim's mom just got her second shot after a scare at her retirement home a few months ago (after some ill-advised outdoor dining - ARIZONA) and we are now trying to make #CONVAXULATIONS happen. Thank you.
posted by jessamyn (retired) at 12:14 PM on February 14 [8 favorites]


I got my second shot of Moderna on Friday and had a 1 degree fever for 24 hours. I've had a needle phobia since a childhood vaccination, and seem to have finally gotten over it with these shots; I really wanted to see that needle go in. Five members of the immediate family have been vaccinated now too.
posted by joeyh at 12:53 PM on February 14 [2 favorites]


My poor mom, 76, got her second shot yesterday and had a miserable night with fever, chills, and terrible headache, but after her third nap of the day is feeling better. She had to drive 45 minutes to get it, which, if you knew my mother's hatred of driving, would tell you a whole lot about her determination to get back to picking out her own groceries. She's still enraged by the temerity of the young grocery picker who insisted that the deli didn't carry sopressata. The deli manager won't soon forget that conversation.
posted by HotToddy at 2:05 PM on February 14 [8 favorites]


UK, which is third in the world behind UAE & Israel, is at the end of getting its top 4 priority categories done, basically the over 70s plus care home workers, 22.5% of the population so far. They will go next in getting down through all of over 50s and health workers by the first week of April. That is basically their 9 priority groups. I'm not clear how second doses fit around that. My dad, MiL and FiL all got first shots without a problem but my sister, a paramedic, had a bad reaction to her shot and had to be rushed in to hospital. I don't think she has ever had a bad reaction to anything before. She was ok after treatment but a bit of a worry.
posted by biffa at 3:28 PM on February 14 [1 favorite]


Would that be the AstraZeneca vaccine, biffa?
posted by floam at 3:32 PM on February 14


Update here: just got my first shot (AstraZeneca) this afternoon.

It was a public-private partnership between our county and one medical clinic. Hundreds of people were in line during the hour I was there.

I shared this on Facebook and Twitter, and was deluged with stories from across the US of folks not getting appointments. California, New York, Ohio, Virginia, Michigan, Texas, etc.
posted by doctornemo at 4:09 PM on February 14 [1 favorite]


I work for a hospital system in Virginia (though not directly with Covid patients), got my first Pfizer shot the day after Christmas, second one three weeks later.

Mom is in her late 70s with pulmonary hypertension. She gets her healthcare through UC San Diego, which flagged high-risk patients' records and scheduled appointments for them. I told her she HAD to take whatever appointment she was offered, so of course it was at 8am on a Sunday, downtown at Petco Park. She said it was very well-run. She'll get her second shot next week.
posted by shiny blue object at 5:20 PM on February 14 [1 favorite]


Not sure floam, the UK seems to be mix and matching AZ and Pfizer vaccines and could have been either i think.
posted by biffa at 5:54 PM on February 14


My sister has been fully vaccinated due to her job running vaccination clinics. My parents have had part one and will get part two in a couple weeks. Today my husband, whose group just became eligible, was able to get an appointment for early April and my cousin, who also just became eligible has an appointment in March.

I work with volunteers at my job - many of them are seniors and it has been so lovely to hear from several of them that they’ve gotten their vaccinations.
posted by sciencegeek at 6:51 PM on February 14 [2 favorites]


My mom (late 60s, two-time cancer survivor, missing part of a lung due to one of those cancers) got her first Pfizer shot in late January and gets her second in two weeks. My dad (mid 70s, little bit of hypertension but otherwise pretty healthy) took part in a Johnson and Johnson clinical trial and recently learned that he was in the group that got the real vaccine. Super happy for both of them.

As for me, I’ve mentioned here before that I’m a healthcare worker who works from home for now. My employer does not have their own vaccine supply at the moment, but they sent around links to various community resources and strongly encouraged everyone, even non patient-facing folks, to get vaccinated. Even then, I waited for a little bit until my boss asked me pointedly when I was going to get it done, at which point I signed up to go to my neighborhood RiteAid. Had my first dose of Moderna, arm was incredibly sore on the day after but otherwise no side effects. Getting round two next weekend.

Everything’s great here then, right? It was, until today when I got into a stupid fight with my soon-to-be-ex roommate and she told me to think long and hard about whether someone would die because I got vaccinated.

My work from home gig is the single most extraordinary gift I’ve gotten in this pandemic. It lifted me from a place that was well on the way to giving me PTSD to one where I am appreciated and able to keep healthy boundaries. There is not a single day where I don’t think about how god damned lucky I am. To be told by someone I trusted that I don’t care about others’ deaths because of my decisions is fucking me up real bad, even after pretty much everyone else I know who’s commented says I did the right thing.

So right now I’m suppressing the urge to heap more verbal abuse on ex-roommate, which has unfortunately been my pattern, and instead commit to giving more time to the (outdoor, masked) volunteer work I’ve been doing for years with people experiencing homelessness and also upping my donations to the causes I believe in. If I’m going to be vaccinated, have minimal exposure to other people, and keep making the most money I’ve ever made, I might as well take advantage of all of those factors to do the most good I can in the world.
posted by I am a Sock, I am an Island at 7:14 PM on February 14 [4 favorites]


My 103-year-old grandmother is in a nursing home in Minnesota that’s had a few residents die from Covid over the past year. She’s been moved around as they’ve needed to isolate different sections of building at times. The staff have done a tremendous job, but of course we’ve long worried she'd eventually be infected and wouldn’t stand much of a chance given her age.

In late January she did finally test positive. Fortunately this happened a few weeks after receiving her first dose of the Moderna vaccine, and probably because of that she only experienced mild symptoms that subsided within a few days. She received her second dose soon after and is doing very well now — even regaining a little weight because, as I believe I’ve mentioned previously, she believes the secret to a long life is having dessert after every meal.
posted by theory at 8:20 PM on February 14 [10 favorites]


cheapskatebay, I don't think this is the article you are looking for, but it's another very positive article that I think is worth sharing:
We’re not looking at the most important vaccine statistic.

tl;dr: based on the data we have so far, the Moderna, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Oxford/AstraZeneca, and Novavax vaccines are all really, really good at preventing hospitalizations and death. The vaccine trials so far have measured "do the vaccines prevent symptomatic cases?", not "do the vaccines prevent hospitalization and death?" That was the right thing to measure because measuring the impact on hospitalization and death would have required many more people and might have taken much longer to get enough data for approval, so measuring the impact on symptomatic cases was a reasonable compromise. But as the data rolls in, it seems that all of the vaccines are very good at preventing severe disease even if there's variability in how good they are at preventing symptomatic disease. We're still gathering data so there may be more to learn in this area, but so far the news is good.
posted by Tehhund at 4:00 AM on February 15 [4 favorites]


Also from the UK here. My Facebook feed is full of friends who are either care workers or over 60 getting vaccinations. Such good news every day.

I am grateful that this is one part of the pandemic that the British aren't messing up so far.
posted by plonkee at 11:29 AM on February 15


My covid test came back negative, my shot was innocuous until 3AM or so, when I was dreaming of being trapped in my covers, and my grown cats were now kittens stored in a box of water, underwater, right, so I took them out, and they perked up and became full grown cats again. So I got up, and went to take 3 ibuprofen, dropped one, and just took 2. It helped, I woke up feeling wretched, and continued to do so today, took more ibuprofen later in the day, now my tummy is playing unhappy. But, I think I will feel almost normal tomorrow. Working toward almost normal. I have been told that I am now immune and I kind of think March 1 is immune day for me. I am relieved.
posted by Oyéah at 5:13 PM on February 16 [1 favorite]


To my mild surprise, I actually got an email from our county's public health folks inviting me to sign up for my second dose (Moderna), so I'll be getting it this Sunday. Woohoo! Much like with my first dose, my whole little SLP work clique signed up to get #2 on the same day and around the same time, and we'll probably have another texting party as we drive through the line. It's nice to have a group to celebrate this with.

I'm already wondering if I should just plan for side effects and take Monday off, but I don't want to miss seeing my Monday students and part of me is certain I'll be immune to side effects anyway (this is the same part of my brain that's quite confident that I could touch poison ivy without ill effects so I probably shouldn't rely on that). Guess we'll see come Monday!
posted by DingoMutt at 7:06 PM on February 16 [1 favorite]


Hard to say about side effects and work — my second dose of Pfizer gave me fatigue but not enough to miss work unless I was looking for an excuse. OTOH my wife's second dose of Pfizer definitely would have prevented her from working. Nothing troubling, just like a bad cold, but bad enough that staying in bed was the right call.
posted by Tehhund at 7:22 PM on February 16 [1 favorite]


Sure did! My public defender office got vaccinated in the last few weeks, and other than incapacitating half the office the day after the 2nd dose, it's been very well received. Myself, I had a mild fever for a day and my brain didn't really work. But it's nice to have it all done with, and now I can spend a bit more time with clients in jail.
posted by Happydaz at 11:22 PM on February 16 [3 favorites]


In law parents fully vaccinated and 2 in law siblings who are while their partners are not. My mother in law got "covid arm" as some folks are calling it - about a hand sized red mark that was very itchy and sore and gradually moved down her arm before dissipating. Husband and I are on the waiting list for our county but they said it could still be a few weeks until we actually get scheduled. My mom will probably not get it (partly for allergy reasons and partly for listening to conspiracy theories on facebook reasons, sigh) and her husband might not either. I'm waffling on how strict to be about them seeing the kids once we have it - mom rarely goes anywhere these days but her husband is in and out all the time, though I think he does wear a mask.
posted by brilliantine at 6:53 AM on February 17


My parents got it! Yay!! (I told my mom I was impressed she signed herself up--my dad got it through work--because of the legion of stories about Gen X/millennials who have to navigate the online systems on behalf of their parents. My mom was not impressed with herself, though!)
posted by ferret branca at 1:42 PM on February 18 [1 favorite]


Spouse and I got into the Novavax trial and are getting our second shots on Monday. 2/3 chance at a real vaccine, and the UK efficicacy data against the "ancestral" variant looks comparable to the mRNA vaccines. I'm really hoping we both feel briefly sick after shot 2, but if not, the trial just got approved to turn into a blinded crossover design, so placebo-injected subjects should get called back for vaccine in the coming months and vice versa. I'll take it. I work on a health sciences campus as a full time researcher, but not with patients so the guidance has been that we should expect to be at the back of the line.
posted by deludingmyself at 4:01 PM on February 18 [3 favorites]


Today I got an email saying that my second dose (which I was going to get this Sunday) has been postponed due to all that winter weather. We've gotten zero actual winter weather here in Eugene - I realize the problem lies in snow that occurred elsewhere, but it's still a bummer to both have to postpone my second vaccine AND miss out on any snow. Even so, I feel fortunate to live somewhere where I'm actually receiving communications and proactive scheduling for the whole thing.

I've rescheduled for March 2, which is still within that six-week window we supposedly have to get dose #2 of Moderna. It actually works out better for me schedule-wise in case I do end up sick the following day (though I'm still sure I won't), so I suppose all is well.
posted by DingoMutt at 7:00 PM on February 18 [1 favorite]


I got my first shot - Pfizer - on the 26th of last month and the second last Friday. The location was at a hall at Seattle U across from Swedish Hospital. The first time I stood in a line of about 300 and it took about an hour to get through to the shot. The second time, I stood in a line of about 1800 people which snaked through seven loops back to front in a parking garage that took 2 hours to get to where I started the first time. And when I got to the door, a shift change for the volunteers took place and I stayed put for a half hour in a stiff freezing cold wind -- my hands were still cramped when I got home an hour later.

Never felt either shot and no side effects ensued from the first. After the second, I was so fatigued that I could barely get vertical the next day. I was whuppeds. Am better now. All I suffer from now is cabin fever. I hope you all sail through yours. Be well.
posted by y2karl at 7:35 PM on February 18 [2 favorites]


Our collective bestie is giving shots today so that he can get his first one, and we are ecstatic. He's going to be safer going to school, safer visiting the reservation, etc.

My daddy is getting his second shot next week and I am so so so so so relieved.
posted by joycehealy at 3:54 PM on February 19 [3 favorites]


My mom finally got scheduled for hers for next week. What a relief.

Meanwhile, I got my first dose this week. I thought I'd be chasing a slot for a few months, but instead got extremely lucky (this is the first week I was eligible). Some arm soreness, nothing too bad. Also feeling mildly rundown and rather sleepy, but I can't even confidently attribute that to the vaccine as opposed to, well, life. We'll see about #2. I told the nurse who administered the shot that I would give her a hug if I could.
posted by praemunire at 10:58 PM on February 19 [3 favorites]


My father-in-law has an appointment for next week! (My mother-in-law is enough younger that she's not eligible here yet.) They live next door so this is not just great for them but a safety improvement for us, too.
posted by restless_nomad (staff) at 6:23 AM on February 20 [2 favorites]


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